Black History, News Roundup

News: Scott lynching re-examined, West Broadway plan push back

April 26, 2019 — An author retraces James T. Scott’s life, ending the silence about her family’s link to his death. Part 1. Columbia Missourian. Summary: Pat Roberts, now deceased, wrote a book about James T. Scott after she learned her aunt was the girl who accused him of attempting to rape her. This accusation by Regina Almstedt, 14, at the time, led to Scott’s murder by lynching. Roberts’ family had never discussed Scott’s murder in 1923. Roberts learned of the family connection from a 2003 series in the Columbia Missourian related to the lynching. The name of the book is “A lynching in Little Dixie: The Life and Death of James T. Scott.”

April 27, 2019 — Lifting the cloud, a detailed history of the Scott lynching. Part 2. Columbia Missourian. Summary: This part outlines why the family never discussed the lynching death of James T. Scott, why the author wrote the book, outlines what Columbia groups have done to mark and/or commemorate Scott’s death.

April 27, 2019 — In the 1990s, a play chronicled James T. Scott’s lynching for local, national audiences. Columbia Missourian. Summary: Eric Wilson and Clyde Ruffin wrote a play, “Strands,” in 1991. The play premiered in Columbia, and went on to win the 1992 Lorraine Hansberry Playwriting Award, and was performed as part of the American College Theatre Festival in the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C.

April 27, 2019 — Rezoning plan revives West Broadway issues. Columbia Daily Tribune. Summary: Local doctor Mohammad Jarbou purchased homes at 917 W. Broadway, 919 W. Broadway and 14 N. West Blvd., with plans to demolish them and redevelop the area. Columbia residents are pushing back.

Note: A Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/groups/SaveHistoricBroadway/, has been created to disseminate information about thwarting the effort to demolish the houses.

April 30, 2019 — Guest Commentary: Columbia only goes through the motions of racial reconciliation. Columbia Missourian. Summary: Author Traci Wilson-Kleekamp states the article and book were insufficient and that the article, book and 2003 series did not property address the harm to Gertrude Carter Scott, Scott’s widow. Wilson-Kleekamp’s commentary calls on the city of Columbia, the University of Missouri and the School of Medicine, where James T. Scott was employed, to do more to highlight Scott’s life. The piece also notes the Columbia Public School should have a curriculum that honors black contributions to the community.

Historical Homes

610 W. Broadway correction

Sometimes even journalists like myself get it wrong. That’s when a correction is in order, even when it is a mistake easily corrected such as on a website.

A page on my site gave the incorrect name for the owners of this 1917 house at 610 W. Broadway, which was named to the Columbia Most Notable Properties List in February 2011. The information has been corrected.

I realized my mistake when I found this resource on line. It is the West Broadway Historic District Property Information Form Prepared by Debbie Sheals for the West Broadway Neighborhood Association 2009. The document is available on line here.

According to this document:

“This lovely home was built about 1917 by A. Fredendall, pioneer Columbia Clothier and merchant.  Mr.Fredendall owned the first Columbia department store, a forerunner of Parks.  At a later date Leonard Morris, restauranteur lived here then the Boyd Lucas family.  The Lucas family owned the Missouri Store, forerunner of the successful and long-standing Mo. Book Store.  Still later, the H.R. Muellers owned and still own here.  TheMuellers had lived in the 900 block of W. Broadway and came here.  Mr. Mueller owned and operated the H.R. Mueller Florist Co.  The family continues his business.”

The owners by year, according to the document:

1925-26 A. Fredendall

1930-36 B. W. Lucas

1940 Boyd. W. Lucas

1947-1979 H. R. Mueller