Missouri State Historical Society, News Roundup, University of Missouri

News: Highlights of Historical Society building and marking ROTC 150th year

May 13, 2019 — New Historical Society building will connect Missourians to a rich past. Source: Columbia Missourian. Summary: The new headquarters for the State Historical Society of Missouri on Elm Street will open this summer. It will be 76,000 feet, double its old home in Ellis Library at MU. The $35 million building includes exterior limestone quarried in Missouri. It was designed by Gould Evans, a Kansas City architectural firm.

May 10, 2019 — With expanded veterans center, MU celebrates campus ROTC. Source: Columbia Missourian. Summary: The review of members of the Army, Navy, Marines and Air Force, an annual event, this year marked the 150th year of ROTC at MU.

Areas, Historical Homes, Resources - Reports

A 1994 view of East Campus

On Monday, Columbia City Council OK’d the creation of a new East Campus neighborhood association. But on this website, I like to look into the past.

Here’s a report from February 1994 that will let you take a peek at the past in the East Campus area. The document includes a 1931 map of the area and an explanation of how the area grew.

Below is a link to coverage of the July 16, 2018 city council meeting.

July 17, 2018 — Council approves new East Campus neighborhood association. Source: Columbia Missourian. Summary: City Council voted to recognized a new neighborhood association for the East Campus area. The new association is the East Campus Traditional Neighborhood Association, made up mainly of landlords. The older organization, the East Campus Neighborhood Association is an older organization made up mainly of homeowners, according to the article.

Events, University of Missouri, Women

Black women fighting for equality

Strong women fighting for equality isn’t new. At 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018, MU History Professor Keona K. Ervin will discuss her book, “Gateway to Equality: Black Women and the Struggle for Economic Justice in St. Louis.”

The event will be held in Fisher Auditorium in 88 Gannett Hall.

According to an announcement from the State Historical Society of Missouri, one of the sponsors of the event, her talk will cover these historic times:

“From the Great Depression to the 1960s, the city of St. Louis experienced significant decline as its population and industrial base stagnated while its suburbs expanded. To combat ingrained racism, crippling levels of poverty, and substandard living conditions, black women workers in St. Louis formed a community-based culture of resistance, fighting for fair and full employment, a living wage, affordable housing, political leadership, and personal dignity… and … effectively grounded working-class struggle in movements for racial justice and set the stage for the defining campaigns of the explosive 1960s.”

The lecture by Ervin is part of a series is sponsored by the State Historical Society of Missouri’s Center for Missouri StudiesUniversity of Missouri’s Division of Inclusion, Diversity, and Equity; and the Missouri Humanities Council.