You can make a difference

If you’ve ever felt discouraged about the demolition of Columbia’s historic structures, here’s a way you can get involved. The Columbia Historic Preservation Commission schedules work days to save parts of houses and structures before they’re demolished. Those items are then stored and later offered for sale.

Door and hardware from 121 S. Tenth St., March 1, 2016.

Solid wood doors and hardware saved prior to the demolition of the James Apartments, 121 S. Tenth St.

You can get involved saving these important parts of buildings before they’re lost.

Here’s a message from Pat Fowler, chair of the HPC:

Saturday, June 17, we are planning a salvage work day and a small scale salvage on a house soon to be demolished.  We need about 10 volunteers, in four-hour shifts, and a couple of pick-up trucks.  The city has set aside salvage from the Blind Boone home renovation and materials donated for our transport to our salvage barn in Rock Quarry Park.

One team will go to the little house and then join us to transport the Blind Boone salvage.

Part of our plan is to label the source of the Blind Boone Salvage and other items so that when we offer them for sale later this summer, we can convey to our purchasers as much information as we haveThe little house has some cool cabinets, some trim and we’d like to practice pulling some hardwood floor.

One of our new members on Historic Preservation, John Gagliardi, will be our team lead on the little house.

If you are interested, please send an email to fowlerpatj@gmail.com, or message us on the City of Columbia Historic Preservation Commission Facebook page, with your contact info.  We’ll send out specific start times, a suggested list of things to bring and be ready for your participation.

Under your feet tour Saturday, Oct. 15

W.E. Edwards established the Edwards Brick & Tile Company in 1896 in Columbia, Missouri.

W.E. Edwards established the Edwards Brick & Tile Company in 1896 in Columbia, Missouri.

Love history? Love knowing about what other people miss? Here’s your chance to learn about history literally under your feet and to learn about something most people never think about — the building techniques and materials of brick streets.

A free tour is set for 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 15, 2016, and will be conducted by Patrick Earney, a professional engineer and member of Columbia’s Historic Preservation Commission. The tour will start from the City Hall Key Sculpture at the corner of Eighth and Broadway, 701 E. Broadway.

See you there – wait? You can’t go? Here’s some information about the event and Columbia’s brick streets.

Tour information

Brick streets worth saving, Columbia Tribune, Dec. 1, 2012.

City of Columbia brick street background information, Oct. 21, 2015. Complete with a cool map!

From this site, a brief history, including some financial information and a bit about Columbia Brick and Tile, one of the eight brickworks Columbia, Missouri once boasted.

Finally – a blast from the past. This February 1994 report discusses the brick streets of the East Campus as an area where University of Missouri faculty once lived. The report includes historic maps. It’s a long download, even with a fast connection, but a great read.  A Final Report of Survey of the East Campus Neighborhood, Columbia, Missouri, Osmund Overby, Howard Marshall, Scott Myers, Debbie Sheals, Ray Brassieur.

Learn and snag some history

Looking for something unique? Want to learn how to fix up your home?

Both of those two possibilities will be on tap from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. tomorrow, Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 10 and 11 at the city’s storage barn in Rock Quarry Park at 2002 Grindstone Parkway.

Members of the Columbia Historic Preservation Commission and untold volunteers have managed to snag and store items from more than a dozen historic buildings that have been razed. Now, those items that range from bathtubs to window frames will be sold.

But it’s not just a historic shop-a-thon. According to this article in the Columbia Daily Tribune, there will be workshops at 11:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. on Saturday to help people learn how to reinstall the doors and windows.

The sale will be cash or check only, noted Pat Fowler, a member of the Historic Preservation Commission, in the article. The take from the sale will go to the city and set aside for future preservation efforts.

Can’t attend the sale or workshops? You can still keep up with preservation efforts by connecting with the Facebook page of the City of Columbia Historic Preservation Commission.

Mystery ghost tour of MU in photos

Did you have to miss last night’s ghost tour? Here’s a photo/text peek at the tour which was hosted by Columbia’s Historic Preservation Commission.

The tour discussed the ghosts and mysteries associated with the Residence on the Quad, the Columns as the remains of Academic Hall, where the Shack once stood, McAlester Hall, the Conley House and the Missouri Theatre.

This online tour is via the Columbia Missourian article headlined Historical Conservation Commission leads haunted Columbia tour.

 

Halloween walking tour on Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2015

A free walking tour is on tap for Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2015. The tour is being offered by Columbia’s Historic Preservation Commission. The tour will meet at 6 p.m. on MU’s Francis Quadrangle.

For more information about the Historic Preservation Commission and walking tours, check out this blog: https://comorevamp.wordpress.com/2015/09/14/upcoming-walking-tours/

Oct. 23, 2015 — Historic Preservation Commission hosts spooky walking tour — Columbia Missourian.

http://www.columbiamissourian.com/news/local/historic-preservation-commission-hosts-spooky-walking-tour/article_26f22722-78ca-11e5-8e39-b73794142a89.html

Scary history on display Oct. 28, 2015

There’s more to history than old buildings — there are the tales within. Those tales, scary and otherwise, will be on display in a history tour set for 6:30 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2015.

The Columbia Historic Preservation Commission holds historic tours periodically. The most recent was Sunday, Sept. 20, 2015.

Several more are scheduled including on at 10 a.m. on Nov. 7 titled Vocabulary of Architecture and another on “Quirky Locals,” the date, time and place to be announced.

Learn more about the Columbia Historic Preservation Commission on their blog at comorevamp.wordpress.com or on the HPC’s Facebook page.

Missed the one on Sept. 20? Find out what you missed by reading this Sept. 21, 2015 article on historic tours in the Columbia Missourian headlined “Locals tour downtown Columbia to learn about history.”

http://www.columbiamissourian.com/news/local/locals-tour-downtown-columbia-to-learn-about-history/article_e95f2e16-5fdb-11e5-a5a9-cb1c42bd31df.html

Bungalows and local couple celebrated for historic preservation

The bungalow-studded neighborhood on Hubbell Drive and Lucy and Hugo Vianello will be celebrated at a free event set for 6:30 p.m. May 11, 2015, to highlight historic preservation in Columbia, Missouri.

The event, sponsored by Columbia’s Historic Preservation Commission, will be held in the historic Missouri Theatre — the building that Hugo and Vianello are being honored for preserving and restoring. The 1928 theatre is at 203 S. Ninth St., Columbia, Missouri. It was modeled after the Paris Opera House and was designed by Boller Brothers, according to this University of Missouri website.

This May 11, 2015 article in the Columbia Missourian outlines the homes and the contributions of the Vianellos.

Each year, the Historic Preservation Commission honors people and places of historic significance.

http://www.columbiamissourian.com/a/188617/historic-preservation-commission-recognizes-hubbell-drives-1920s-bungalows/