All Media Coverage

Here are links to media reports about Columbia and Boone County historic properties.

2017

  • August 2017 — Williams Hall, Columbia Business Times. Summary: This Flashback article and photograph by Rachel Thomas highlights the 1851 building at Columbia College. It started life as an unfinished mansion of James Bennett.
  • July 2, 2017 — New data on an old disgrace: Missouri had second highest number of lynchings outside Deep South, Columbia Missourian. Summary: A new study by the Equal Justice Initiative shows that Missouri had 60 lynchings from 1877 to 1950.
  • June 29, 2017 — Columbia, Missouri: A lesson in art history, Vox magazine of the Columbia Missourian. Summary: A collection of five articles about theatres in Columbia, includes timelines for several theatres. Those covered include the Missouri Theatre, the Maplewood Barn Theatre, the Hall Theatre, Rynsburger, Jesse Auditorium.
  • June 15, 2017 — The Gathering Place will close in December due to budget cuts at MU, Columbia Missourian. Summary: The bed and breakfast at 606 S. College will be closed by MU. It has been operating since 1996. It has been owned by the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources since 2008. The article states that MU expects to save $150,000 per year by closing the bed and breakfast, which was to have provided experience for MU hospitality students. The article cites the bed and breakfast’s website as stating that the house was built by Cora Davenport in 1906 and has been used as a fraternity house for Lambda Chi Alpha, Alpha Gamma Rho, Tau Kappa Epsilon and Sigma Tau Gamma.
  • May 30, 2017 — The Conley House, Columbia Business Times, Flashback. Summary: Contrasting a postcard image with a present day photograph, the article states the house was built in 1869, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. It states he lived there with his wife and four sons. Note, the couple had five children including one daughter Helen Singleton Conley.
  • May 30, 2017 — Historical figures share their stories at Columbia Cemetery, Columbia Missourian. Summary: Event coverage of Memorial Day event sponsored by Columbia Cemetery Association Board. The event featured monologs given by actors portraying J. W. “Blind” Boone, Jane Froman, Ann Hawkins Gentry, George Swallow, John Lathrop, Luella St. Clair Moss, James S. Rollins and Walter Williams.
  • May 30, 2017 — Local history comes to life, Columbia Daily Tribune. Summary: Event coverage of Memorial Day event sponsored by Columbia Cemetery Association Board. The event featured monologs given by actors portraying J. W. “Blind” Boone, Jane Froman, Ann Hawkins Gentry, George Swallow, John Lathrop, Luella St. Clair Moss, James S. Rollins and Walter Williams.
  • May 27, 2017 — The Final Ticket: Lucy’s Corner Cafe closes its doors, Columbia Daily Tribune. Summary: Cafe at 522 E. Broadway to close after 13 years under Lucy Reddick’s ownership. Includes some history of the location
  • May 13, 2017 —Living History event planned for Memorial Day, Columbia Tribune. Summary: An event from 1 to 4 p.m. on May 29, 2017, will bring to life nine historic figures through four-minute monologs. Those figures will be:
    • J.W. “Blind” Boone;
    • Jane Froman;
    • Ann Hawkins Gentry, Columbia postmistress from 1838-1865;
    • George Swallow, Missouri’s first state geologist, and MU faculty member;
    • John Lathrop, president of MU twice;
    • Sgt. Wallace Lilly, a slave who enlisted in the Union Army in 1864;
    • Luella St. Clair Moss, Columbia College president from 1893 to 1920
    • James S. Rollins, a man considered the father of MU;
    • Walter Williams, founder of the MU School of Journalism and MU president from 1931-1935.
  • April 29, 2017 — East Campus Bed & Breakfast, Columbia Daily Tribune. Summary: The home at 1315 University Ave., is again a bed and breakfast. This article outlines a grand opening. Joy Piazza is operating the bed and breakfast. It had operated as the University Avenue Bed and Breakfast for 21 years prior to closings in December of 2016.
  • April 25, 2017 —More’s Lake might return to its former glory after years of sitting filled with ash, Columbia Missourian. Summary: A lake once used for water to cool the power plant and then used as a place to dump ash from when the Columbia Municipal Power Plant burned coal has been drained. Due to environmental concerns and regulations, the ash will be removed and taken to the landfill. The lake was created in the late 1800s by Elawson Carry More. It was once used as community fishing and recreation area. Hopes were expressed that might be again. The piece includes this link to a historical document about Columbia’s power and water developments.
  • April 21-22, 2017 — Quirky Quonset huts to go, but one remains a quirky reminder of MU’s past, Columbia Missourian. Summary: Two Quonset huts on College Avenue are set to be demolished by owner Robert Craig. The article outlines the history of MU’s Quonset huts, which were used for quick space during the 1940-post World War II enrollment increase due to former soldiers taking advantage of the GI Bill. The article notes the Quonset huts housed 2,800 student and, citing MU archives, were also used “as a textbook office, a laboratory and hospital office space.”
  • April 3, 2017 — City sets date for More’s Lake project public hearing, ABC17News.com. Summary: Public hearing about contract to remove ash from More’s Lake.
  • April 2-3, 2017 — Holding on to pieces of the past, Columbia Missourian. Summary: Discusses salvage effort on The Bull Pen Cafe, 2310 Business Loop 70 E Columbia, MO 65201. The article quotes former owner Jackie Cockrell and Pat Fowler of the Historic Preservation Commission. The Bull Pen Cafe opened in 1951. On this date, the building is owned by Marty Riback, who plans to demolish the building.
  • March 30, 2017 — A rich past, a hazy future, Columbia Missourian. Summary: Article about the house at 216 S. Fifth St., in the shadow of student housing being built. Includes some history of the house and former resident Brian Matney, and owners of the property Adam Dushoff, Jeremy Brown and Matt Jenn.
  • March 28, 2017 — Old Coca-Cola plant, former Varsity Theatre take Cornerstones honors, Columbia Missourian. A new program called Cornerstones of Columbia is being launched by Brent Gardner. The first two buildings to be honored are 17 N. Ninth St., which now houses The Blue Note, and 10 Hitt St., which now houses Ragtag Cinema, Uprise Bakery and Hitt Records.
  • March 17, 2017 — Jury splits in mock trial of former Tribune publisher, Columbia Daily Tribune. Summary: A mock trial in reference to the 1923 lynching of James T. Scott looked at whether the then publisher of the Columbia Daily Tribune Ed Watson caused the lynching. The article notes that an editor by Watson on April 28, 1923 stated: “called for ‘swift justice — by the courts, of cours’ but also wrote that three accused rapists held in the jail ‘should feel the halter draw.’ “
  • March 16, 2017 — Historic preservation commission selects Most Notable Properties winner, the Columbia Daily Tribune: Summary: Four properties were selected for the Columbia Historic Preservation Commission’s Most Notable Properties list. The properties were: 1415 University Ave., 401 West Blvd., S., 1223 Frances Drive, 17 and 19 N. Fifth St.
  • March 14, 2017 — Commission selects Most Notable Properties winners, after using secret code. Columbia Missourian. Four properties, 1415 University Ave., 401 West Blvd., S., 1223 Frances Drive., and 17 and 19 N. Fifth St., were named to the Most Notable properties List. The vote was done through a secret code to keep the information from getting out prior to notification of property owners, said Rusty Palmer, City of Columbia staff liaison to the Historic Preservation Commission. This violated the Sunshine Law that requires City Council commissions to make decisions in public.
  • March 10, 2017 —Bull Pen Cafe building will face the wrecking ball, Columbia Missourian, accessed March 19, 2017. Summary: The Bull Pen Cafe at 2310 Business Loop, open for 60 years prior to its closure in 2007, will be demolished. Salvage efforts will take place starting at 9 a.m. on Saturday, March 25, 2017. Here’s a link to a July 20, 2008 Columbia Missourian article about the Bull Pen. The headline is, “Cafe irreplaceable to regulars.
  • March 7, 2017 — Columbia’s most notable properties will be announced Tuesday/Unique properties await recognition, Columbia Missourian. Summary: The nominees for Columbia’s Most Notable Properties list included: 401 West Blvd., S.; 1415 University Ave., the former Phi Mu sorority house, 1506 University Ave., 1619 University Ave.; 1508 Ross St., the former home of Arthur and Annette Case. Annette helped to found the Columbia Art League and was one of the first women graduates of the Kansas State University Chemistry and Genetics Department, and Arthur helped found MU’s Dept. of Veterinary Medicine; 1003 Sunset Drive, former home of La La and Bernard Dean Walters, influential Columbia residents, and the house has a wooden floor made from leftovers from the old Columbia Propeller factory; 823 Crestland Ave., a house nicknamed the “Backward House,” because the front porch faces the backyard; and 17 and 19 on N. 5th St., the only remaining buildings from  historic Sharp End African-American business district.
  • March 5, 2017 — Concert to show off beauty of what organ is, could be, Columbia Tribune. Summary: Firestone-Baars Chapel organ performance meant to highlight the qualities of the 1950s Aeolian-Skinner organ. The organ needs $190,000 in renovations. The concert was by Haig Mardirosian. Firestone-Baars Chapel is on the campus of Stephens College.
  • Feb. 24, 2017 — Trial society to take former Tribune publisher to mock court, Columbia Daily Tribune, accessed Feb. 26, 2017. Summary: The Historical and Theatrical Trial Society of the University of Missouri Law School will hold a mock trial for Ed Watson, the editor and proprietor of the Columbia Daily Tribune in 1923, when James T. Scott was lynched. The article quotes Frank Bowman, an MU law professor, as saying, “The newspaper coverage from the Tribune all but calls for a lynching.”
  • Feb. 24, 2017 — A pdf of the April 28 1923 editorial by Ed Watson.
  • Feb. 20, 2017, Bond puts Mid-Missouri mansion on the market, Columbia Tribune: Summary: The home of former Sen. Kit Bond in Moberly, Missouri, is on the market. It was built in the 1930s by A.P. Green. A.P. Green “incorporated AP. Green Fire Brick Co. in 1915,” the article states. The company is now part of Harbison Walker International.

2016

  • Sept. 6, 2016 — Service set in stone, Columbia Daily Tribune. Summary: A historical marker has been placed to highlight the graves of the local men who served in the 68th U.S. Colored Troops Infantry. This article recounts where and how they served. According to this article, 459 black men from Boone County, Missouri, served in the Union Army.
  • Aug. 26, 2016 — A Fresh Memory of Sharp End, Columbia Business Times. This article by Brandon Hoops includes historic photos and the insights of Jim Whitt, Ed Tibbs, Lorenzo Lawson, Bill Thompson and Georgia Porter.
  • Aug. 28-29, 2016 — A somber centennial. Columbia Missourian. Reviews the history of the Hall Theatre, built in 1916, now vacant and owned by Stan Kroenke’s company, TKG Hall Theatre.
  • Aug. 24, 2016 — Columbia Downtown Leadership Council favors escalating fees for street, sidewalk closures. Columbia Missourian. Summary: Struggle to manage downtown apartment development continues.
  • Aug. 11, 2016 — Historical survey to be conducted for North-Central neighborhood. Columbia Missourian. Summary: The area bordered by Rogers Street, College Avenue, Ash Street, Walnut Street and Park Avenue will be surveyed. Information sheets will be created about the more than 220 structures in the area.
  • Aug. 9, 2016 — City to document history of North Central neighborhood. Columbia Daily Tribune. Summary: A surveyor will be hired to document an 85-acre area by May 26, 2017. The $20,000 project is funded from a Missouri Dept. of Natural Resources grant and $8,000 in city funds.
  • July 28, 2016 — Historic East Campus house demolished for new apartment building, this article outlines the demolition of the William T. Bayless house at 1316 Bass Ave. The house, the article notes was 100 years old and Bayless was a treasurer of Stephens College from 1905-1926.
  • July 27, 2016 — Crews work to remove rubble after Victorian-style house demolished, Columbia Missourian. Summary: Houses at 1312 and 1316 Bass Ave. were razed to make way for a 16-unit apartment building in the East Campus neighborhood.
  • June 28, 2016 — Sigma Nu comes down, Columbia Missourian. Summary: The fraternity house at 710 S. College Ave. is demolished. A new fraternity house will replace it.
  • June 17, 2016 — No injuries reported after car rashes into historic property, Columbia Tribune. Summary: A car hit the house at 121 West Blvd., but there was no structural damage.
  • June 17, 2016 — Renovations begin at Douglass High, Columbia Daily Tribune. Summary: The 100-year-old school at 310 N. Providence Road is under going $6.1 million in renovations. The work should be completed by August 2017.
  • May 23, 2016 — Construction of Hagan school in central Columbia delayed for second time, Columbia Daily Tribune. Summary: Despite the demolition of a house at 1404 E. Broadway and Stephens College’s Hillcrest Hall in 2013, this college preparatory academy has still not been built.
  • May 13, 2016 — Developer plans restaurant space at former Koonse Glass building, Columbia Tribune. Summary: John Ott plans to turn the building at 300 N. Tenth St., formerly occupied by Koonse Glass into a building with a cafe, art gallery or retail space.
  • May 6, 2016 — Developer seeks to demolish historic East Campus houses, Columbia Missourian. Summary: Two Victorian houses, 1312 Bass Ave., and 1316 Bass Ave., have had demolition permits applied for, according to this May 6, 2016 article in the Columbia Missourian.
  • April 19, 2016 — Plaque to mark site of last public lynching in Columbia, Missouri, Associated Press. Summary: Outlines forthcoming plaque to mark death of James Scott, victim of Columbia’s last public lynching.
  • April 7, 2016 —Second Missionary Baptist Church reflects o 150 years of rich history, Vox magazine of the Columbia Missourian. Summary: History of the church at Fourth and Broadway.
  • March 19, 2016 — Group begins salvage of historic downtown building, Columbia Tribune. Summary: 121 S. Tenth St., salvage project headed up by Pat Fowler of the Historic Preservation Commission.
  • March 17, 2016 — Preserving Maplewood: Original family furnishings add to the historical appeal, Columbia Missourian. Summary: Two story Lenoir house under going $182,400 in renovations, with the funds coming from the city of Columbia and the U.S. Dept. of Interior’s Historic Preservation Fund Grant. The house is 139 years old, it was built by Slater Ensor Lenoir and wife Margaret Bradford Lenoir. It was occupied by Lavinia Lenoir, their daughter, and her husband Frank G. Nifong.
  • March 2, 2016 — Law student starts petition to preserve historic downtown, The Maneater. Summary: Grace Shemwell, a second-year MU law student started a petition to save the James Condominium, the former Winn Hotel, at 121 S. Tenth St. While the petition with 2,636 signatures can’t save this building set for demolition, she plans to work with city officials to create zoning to protect historic buildings and incentivize affordable student housing.
  • to March 2, 2016 — Preservations scour hotel, apartment buildings for historic gems, Columbia Missourian. Summary: Efforts to remove features from the James Condominium or Winn Hotel at 121 S. Tenth St., prior to demolition set for later in March 2016.
  • March 2, 2016 — Group surveys historic downtown hotel before demolition, Columbia Daily Tribune. Summary: Documentation of items in and to be removed from the James Condominium or Winn Hotel at 121 S. Tenth St.
  • Feb. 16, 2016 — Let them rise, Columbia Missourian. Summary: Why and how the James Apartments at 121 S. Tenth St., and several other buildings will be demolished.
  • Feb. 13, 2016 — Program urges remembrance of lynching, Columbia Daily Tribune. Summary: MU’s Association of Black Graduate and Professional Students is raising funds for a historical for the place where James Scott, 35, a janitor at MU’s School of Medicine was lynched in 1923. The article reports on Keona Ervin’s talk, “Black Bodies Swinging: Lynching and Making of Modern America.” Scott was a WWI veteran, his wife Gertrude Carter was a teacher at Douglass School, they were members of Second Baptist Church and had a new car. Ervin’s talk said lynching were “highly stylized, ritualistic and public spectacles … a response to black political and economic assertion.”

2015

April 2015 — Flashback, Guitar Building, 22 N. Eighth St., Columbia Business Times.

Guitar Building, 22 N. Eighth St., historic image and present image, highlighted in article the April 2015 edition of the Columbia Business Times, used with permission.

Guitar Building, 22 N. Eighth St., historic image and present image, highlighted in article the April 2015 edition of the Columbia Business Times, used with permission.

Jan. 14, 2015 — “Blind” Boone focus of artistic performance at diversity celebration. Columbia Missourian.

2014

  • July 11, 2014 —Historic Preservation Commission organizes downtown walking tours – Columbia Daily Tribune. The Historic Preservation Commission will hold free, historic tours at 7:30 p.m. on July 31, 2014, August 14, 2014, Sept. 18, 2014 and Oct. 30, 2014. Tours will meet at the City Hall “key,” on Broadway and Eighth Street.
  • July 10, 2014 — Richard King sells The Blue Note, Mojo’s — Columbia Daily Tribune.
  • July 9, 2014 — Richard King passes torch, sells The Blue Note, Mojo’s —  Columbia Missouri.
  • July 2014 — The Battle For Stewart Park — Inside Columbia magazine. Summary: History of Stewart Park and a bit about John Stewart.
  • June 17, 2014 — Aviation sign uncovered at Columbia demolition site — Summary: A sign, “Stephens College Aviation Department,” was found during city demolition of a building at Cosmos Park. Stephens College had an aviation department at the then Columbia Municipal Airport from 1941 until 1960. Stephens College Scene.
  • June 5, 2014 — More ‘historic’ Columbia properties demolished in 2013 — Numbers of demolitions of historic buildings increase: 60 in 2013, 43 in 2012, 34 in 2011. Columbia Daily Tribune.
  • April 27, 2014 — Mural project unites neighborhood — The Heibel-March building is now home to Grove Construction and volunteers finally finished a mural began in 2007, a project that faltered when the renovation of the 1910 building seemed to be at a standstill. Columbia Tribune.
  • April 2, 2014 — Former Fairview church among Most Notable Property honorees — Highlights the former church which now houses Countryside Nursery School, and notes Chapel Hill used to be the the southern portion of West Boulevard, but was renamed due to its proximity to the church, which also gave its name to Fairview Road.
  • April 2, 2014 — Historic properties celebrated at 15th annual Most Notable event — This article by Andrew Denney Outlines a few facts for each of the five properties named to the Most Notable properties list by Columbia’s Historic Preservation Commission. The properties are: Fairview United Methodist Church at 1320 S. Fairview Road., Fairview Cemetery at Chapel Hill and Fairview Road, Francis Pike House at 1502 Anthony St., Bess and Dr. J.E. Thornton House at 905 S. Providence Road.
  • March 31, 2014 — City gets state grant to conduct historic preservation seminars — Workshops will be held for residents to learn about how to renovate their homes, including windows, paint and flooring. The workshops are funded by a Missouri Department of Natural Resources grant giving to the City of Columbia’s Historic Preservation Commission.
  • March 25, 2014 — Auditor says Missouri historic tax credits program too expensive — Missouri State Auditor Tom Schweich says less than half the of the $1.1 billion spent on historic tax credits is spent on projects. The rest is used when developers sell the credits to individuals or companies that use them to reduce their tax liability. Columbia Tribune.
  • March 17, 2014 — Columbia City Council agrees to fix brick roads, add more — Discusses approval of city agreement to uncover and restore brick streets. Includes link to information noting the cost of uncovering brick streets at about $100,000 per city block.
  • March 16, 2014 — Columbia City Council to vote on brick street — Outlines reasons and costs for uncovering, replacing Columbia’s brick streets. Notes asphalt streets last about 15 years, brick streets about 100. Notes brick streets are deteriorating because of poor foundations.
  • March 7, 2014 — Blind pianists’ duel was a sight to behold — Discusses the background of the “Blind Tom” Wiggins and J.W. “Blind” Boone historic piano duel, which was re-enacted on March 3, 2014 on Boone’s 1891 Chickering Grand at the Boone County Historical Society.
  • March 6, 2014 — Heibel-March Building to open after 16 years of vacancy.
  • March 5, 2014 — “The Battle of the Keys,” outlines the historic concert competition between J.W. “Blind” Boone and “Blind Tom” Wiggins. Boone’s former home is at 10 N. Fourth St.
  • Feb. 20, 2014 — City plans to complete interior restoration of ‘Blind’ Boone home this year. Columbia Tribune. The home of J.W. “Blind” Boone, a famous pianist, still needs interior restoration, which the City of Columbia plans to do.
  • Feb. 10, 2013 — If walls could talk — The history of the Niedermeyer Apartment building. Columbia Daily Tribune.
  • Feb. 3, 2014 —  Lee Elementary amount sites honored as Notable Properties — Columbia Tribune. Five buildings named to the Notable Properties List by Columbia’s Historic Preservation Commission. Those buildings are Fairview United Methodist Church, 1320 S. Fairview Road, Fairview Cemetery, Lee School, 1208 Locust St., Francis Pike House, 1502 Anthony, Bessie and Dr. J.E. Thornton House, 905 S. Providence.
  • Jan. 31, 2014 — Lost history: Fairview Cemetery reflects buried history — Columbia Missourian. This article highlights the Fairview Cemetery, one of the five sites named to the 2014 Notable Properties List by the Columbia Historic Preservation Commission. The other sites include Fairview United Methodist Church, 1320 S. Fairview Road, Lee School, 1208 Locust St., Francis Pike House, 1502 Anthony, Bessie and Dr. J.E. Thornton House, 905 S. Providence.

2013

  • November 2013 — Columbia, The Beautiful by Morgan McCarty. Inside Columbia. Outlines the architectural finds in Columbia.
  • Sept. 19, 2013 — The downtown Parera Bread location will close at the end of 2013. The restaurant, Panera Bread, is the historic Hall Theatre at 102 S. Ninth St., will close at the end of 2013.
  • June 25, 2013 — Old Stephens buildings to make way for academy soon. Columbia Daily Tribune: Summary: Demolition of Stephens’ Hillcrest Hall, two houses on Dorsey and at house 1404 E. Broadway, will be demolished to make way for the Hagan Scholarship Academy, a place planned as a college preparatory school for students from rural areas.
  • June 2013 — The Hansel and Gretel House — There’s more to this home at 121 West Blvd North than meets the eye.
  • April 14, 2013 — Pianists house is an asset; City’s black history bigger than Boone — Author Doug Hunt argues in this opinion piece that the J.W. “Blind” Boone home at 10 N. Fourth St., should be saved to mark Boone’s success despite obstacles.
  • March 30, 2013 — Candidates give thoughts on “Blind” Boone home — Candidates for Columbia City Council and mayor offer opinions on whether the city should fund the completion of the renovation of the home of J.W. “Blind” Boone at 10 N. Fourth Street. The exterior of the house has been renovated, but inside requires roughly $500,000 in improvements. Columbia Daily Tribune.
  • March 28, 2013 — Missing Mansions. Some historic buildings escape the wrecking ball. Others aren’t so lucky — This article lists and describes six mansions that were razed in the past, including the home of Union General Odon Guitar and the 1843 home of J.L. Stephens, the namesake of Stephens College. Vox Magazine.
  • March 19, 2013 – Council questions Blind Boone home expenditure – A proposal by Columbia City Manager Mike Matthes to spend $475,000 of a city surplus to finish the restoration of the J.W. “Blind” Boone Home was strongly debated at a City Council meeting.
  • March 13, 2013 – Buyer plans to start with basic fixes – Nakhle Asmar, who recently purchased the 1837 Niedermeyer, outlines his plans to update and repair the Niedermeyer. Columbia Daily Tribune.
  • Feb. 20, 2013 — City surplus might fund Boone home restoration — Columbia Tribune. Columbia Mayor Bob McDavid proposed spending $500,000 of a city surplus of $1.9 million to finish restoration of the J.W. “Blind” Boone home at 10 N. Fourth Street.
  • Feb. 5, 2013 — Columbia’s 2013 Most Notable Properties — Properties named to Columbia Most Notable Properties list, including the Niedermeyer Apartments at 920 Cherry St. Columbia Missourian.
  • Feb. 5, 2013 — Commission to honor city’s notable properties: Six buildings to be recognized. Columbia Daily Tribune article.

2012

2011

  • Nov. 29, 2011 — Annie Fisher house torn down — Columbia Daily Tribune. The Annie Fisher house at 2911 Old Highway 63 South was demolished.
  • Nov. 8, 2011 — History, economics drive decisions on brick streets — Columbia Missourian. Debate on whether to pave Short Street with brick.
  • Oct. 23, 2011 — Plans for Heibel-March building stagnate — Columbia Tribune. Building at Rangeline and Wilkes Boulevard is still awaiting renovation. Several other plans to renovate the plans have fallen through.
  • Fall 2011 — Lighting the Way — Summary: Light lenses on store fronts and transoms provide multiplied lights. One example is at 812 E. Broadway. Missouri Resources, permission granted to use a reprint of this information.
  • August 25, 2011 — MU set to lease, operate Missouri Theatre, Columbia Daily Tribune. Agreement made to have University of Missouri lease the theatre at 201 S. Ninth Street.
  • August 11, 2011 — These Old Houses or Two houses preserve part of Columbia’s history. This Vox magazine article focuses on the John W. “Blind” Boone house at 10 N. Fourth St., and the Taylor House at 716 W. Broadway. The online version includes great pictures of both homes.

2010

  • Dec. 2, 2010 — Lifesize gingerbread house for sale, ConnectMidMissouri.com/KRCG. http://www.connectmidmissouri.com/news/story.aspx?id=549106
  • Dec. 2010 — The Arch McCard house at Ash Street and West Boulevard is up for sale. Originally a two-room log cabin, it was built in 1911 and added onto later. It has been owned by Herb and Betty Brown since 1956, and now both have died.
  • Dec. 10, 2010 — Missouri Theatre: A history of volunteerism, Columbia Business Times.
  • Dec. 18, 2010 — Wes Wingate staking presence on East Walnut, Columbia Daily Tribune. This article outlines the renovation of 1020 E. Walnut St., and the business, Columbia Academy of Music, that will be opened there by Wes Wingate.
  • Dec. 30, 2010 —Historic Preservation Commission receives grant for study, Columbia Missourian.
  • Dec. 31, 2010 —State agency OKs grant for Columbia, Columbia Daily Tribune. Preliminary approval of a $12,000 state grant to the city of Columbia to study the economic effect of historic preservation.
  • Oct. 24, 2010 — History & haunts. Columbia Tribune. A walking tour given by the Columbia Historic Preservation Commission. Sites included Senior Hall at Stephens College and on the campus of the University of Missouri, the residence on Frances Quadrangle, Conley House , the Columns, and on Ninth Street, the Missouri Theatre.
  • Oct. 18, 2010 — Historic Guitar Mansion sold to surprised bidder, Oct. 18, 2010, Columbia Missourian.
  • Oct. 19, 2010 — Historic Guitar Mansion sold at auction for $155,000, Oct. 19, 2010, Columbia Daily Tribune.
  • October 2010 — The Guitar Mansion at 2815 Oakland Gravel Road was sold to new owners at auction for $155,500. The home had been valued at $499,000, but had been vacant for several years prior to this purchase.
  • August 29, 2010 — Booches, Guitar Building rack up years downtown, about Guitar Building at 22 N. Eighth St., by Warren Dalton, Columbia Daily Tribune.
  • July 21, 2010 — Arts community shaken by Missouri Theatre closure. Columbia Missourian.
    Summary: Reaction from various art community members to the upcoming August and September 2010 closure of the Missouri Theatre, now the Missouri Theatre Center for the Arts.
  • July 21, 2010 — After closure, uncertainty hangs over Missouri Theatre’s future. Columbia Missourian.
    Summary: Outlines upcoming closure of Missouri Theatre, now the Missouri Theatre Center for the Arts. Includes photos of the grand reopening on May 21, 2008 with Tony Bennett and historic photos. Includes summary of theatre’s financial troubles.
  • July 21, 2010 — Staffers on job market after long uphill journey – Columbia Daily Tribune.
    Summary: The Missouri Theatre, now the Missouri Theatre Center for the Arts, laid off the remaining staff members.
  • July 21, 2010 — Future unclear as theater shuts doors. Hiatus planned until September. – Columbia Daily Tribune. Summary: The Missouri Theatre, built in 1928, was renovated in 2008 for $10 million. Now called the Missouri Theatre Center for the Arts, it still has a debt of $2.5 million and has been plagued by financial troubles. The MTCA will close in August and remain closed into September.
  • July 13, 2010 — Historic sites will go online. – Columbia Daily Tribune.
    Summary: An online map is in the works which will allow anyone to go online and learn all about Columbia’s 121 Notable Properties and 33 properties and areas on the National Register of Historic Places. The project is being funded by a $3,660 grant from the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, with a $2,440 local match. Completion date is scheduled for November 2011.
  • July 7, 2010 — Future of Missouri Theatre uncertain. Columbia Daily Tribune.
    Summary: Column by Bill Clark outlines the troubles the Missouri Theatre, now Missouri Theatre Center for the Arts, faces, including the CEO Eric Staley stepping down as of July 31, 2010.
  • July 2, 2010 — Theater chief to resign after 10 months on job. Columbia Daily Tribune.
    Summary: Eric Staley, CEO of the Missouri Theatre, now named Missouri Theatre Center for the Arts, plans to step down as of July 31, 2010. Says he’s proud of raising $500,000 in his 10 months, and criticizes the structure of the organization.
  • Feb. 19, 2010, Notable Properties: Historic Renovation Boosts Community Commerce, Columbia Business Times. This article outlines the commercial, economic benefits of historic renovation. Includes comments from one of the first commercial buildings to be named a Most Notable Property by the Columbia Historic Preservation Commission. The business owner, Richard King, operates The Blue Note, a thriving live music venue in an old historic theatre. The article includes a list of commercial properties on the Notable Properties List.
  • June 25, 2010 — Capturing Columbia’s Cinema Century— Columbia Business Times.
    Summary: Outlines the history of movie theatres in Columbia and in the nation. Includes extensive time line.
  • June 23, 2010 — Upcoming ruling pivotal to Missouri Theatre’s finances, future. Columbia Missourian.
    Summary: Outline of the financial troubles facing the Missouri Theatre, now the Missouri Theatre Center for the Arts.  The information notes the upcoming August 31 arbitration ruling on a $400,000 in dispute with Huebert Builders stemming from the 2008 $10 million restoration.
  • March 15, 2010, State review board approves historical district on West Broadway, Columbia Missourian.
    Summary: The application for a West Broadway Historic District being named to the National Register of Historic Places was approved by the Missouri Advisory Council on Historic Preservation.
  • Feb. 3, 2010 — Bricks, graves given “most notable” status. Columbia Daily Tribune. Summary: Five properties named to most notable properties list. The properties are Stephens Stables, 203 Old Highway 63, 211 Bingham Road, Berry Building at Walnut and Orr Streets, Columbia’s brick streets, Jewell Cemetery and Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity, 809 S. Providence Road.
  • Feb. 2, 2010 – Historic Preservation Commission names 7 ‘most notable’ properties – Columbia Missourian.
  • Jan. 13, 2010, Historical houses offer glimpse of Columbia’s past, Columbia Missourian.
    Summary: Application submitted for National Register of Historic Places designation for West Broadway Historic District, 300-922 Broadway, except 80, 808, 812.

2009

Oct. 14, 2009 – Boone home inches closer to new life – Columbia Daily Tribune

Sept. 20, 2009 — Zoning issue sets preservationists on edge — The owners of the More-Bowling home on property adjacent to the Municipal Power plant have asked for it to be rezoned to M-1 zoning. Brian Treece, member of Columbia’s Historic Preservation Commission notes the home and property is eligible for the National Register of Historic Places, noting its “cumulative history.”

Aug. 15, 2009 — Apartments to fit in with Missouri Manor site — Columbia Daily Tribune. Missouri Manor Apartments LLC, Travis McGee, Tom Mendenhall, Gary Evans and Paul Humphrey, plan to add apartments and make the manor fit into it. References Tara Apartments which were built around the Rockhurst home.

2008

Summer 2008 — Honoring historic homes — Mizzou, magazine of the Mizzou Alumni Association. Summary: Spotlights homes named to 2006 Columbia Notable Properties which have MU ties. These houses are 211 Westwood Ave., 509 Thilly Ave., 511 Westwood Ave., 2011 N. Country Club Drive, 2007 S. Country Club Drive.

March 8, 2008 — Apartments honored for long-standing service — Columbia Missourian.
Summary: The Belvedere and Beverly apartment buildings, 206 Hitt St., and 211 Hitt St., respectively and  named to the Columbia Notable Properties List.

Feb. 7 2008 — Honoring historic places — Columbia Tribune. Summary: Columbia Historic Commission names Notable Properties including The Belvedere at 206 Hit St., the Beverly at 211 Hitt St., 211 Westwood Ave., 214 St. Joseph St., 509 Thilly, 511 Westwood, Sacred Heart Catholic Church at 1115 Locust St., 2007 S. Country Club Drive, 2011 N. country Club Drive, 1601 Stoney Brook Place,

Jan. 26, 2008 — In historic Columbia, remembering family histories — Columbia Business Times. Summary: Columbia’s Historic Preservation Commission names Most Notable Properties: 1601 Stoney Brook Place, 206 Hitt St., 211 Hitt St., 214 St. Joseph St., 511 Westwood Ave., 211 Westwood Ave., 1115 Locust St., 2011 N. Country Club Drive, 2007 S. Country Club Drive, 509 Thilly Ave.

2005

2004

August 8, 2004. Visions of the past. Columbia Daily Tribune.
Summary: The Guitar House (Guitar Mansion, 2815 Oakland Gravel Road) becomes a bed and breakfast under the ownership of Noel and Mary Ann Crowson. Includes photographs of the restored home, historic photos of Odon Guitar, David Guitar and graphics on the additions to the home from 1859-1940.

May 5, 2004 — Group recognizes local landmarks — Columbia Historic Preservation Commission recognizes 12 properties: 202 S. Glenwood, Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity House at 24 E. Stewart Road, The Heidman House at 709 Broadway, Thomas Hart Bento Elementary School at 1410 Hinkson Ave., Sally Flood house at 1620 Hinkson Ave., the house at 2 E. Stewart Road, the Keene School home at 4713 Brown Station Road, The Champlin House at 1312 W. Broadway, the Arch McHarg (not McCard as reported in this article), at 121 West Blvd., The Wabash Arms Building at 821 Walnut St.

2003

June 18, 2003 — List honors historic sites in Columbia — An article that lists 10 most noteworthy buildings, including Municipal Power Plant, 1501 Business Loop, 70 E., Ann Hawkins Gentry Building, 1 S. Seventh St., Jefferson Junior High School, 713 Rogers St., Hamilton-Brown Shoe Factory, 1123 Wilkes Blvd., Guitar Building, 18 N. Eighth St., McKinney Building, 411 E. Broadway, Robert Wolken residence, 703 Westmount Ave., Switzler Hall on Francis Quadrangle, Calvary Episcopal Church, 123 S. Ninth St., Fifth Street Christian Church, 401 N. Fifth St., Columbia Tribune. http://archive.columbiatribune.com/2003/jun/20030618news003.asp

May 8, 2003 — Legacy of a Lynching, Columbia Missourian. A five-part series on the 1923 lynching of James Scott.

1991

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