Homes

This is a list of homes in numerical order by address. Most of these houses have been named to Columbia’s Historic Preservation Commission’s Notable Properties List or the National Register of Historic Places.

  • LIST OF HOMES
  • 2 E. Stewart Road, ca. 1929, Spanish Eclectic. Daniel A. and Gona Wilkerson House. Named to Notable Properties List in 2004.
  • 7 Edgewood Ave., ca. 1926, Craftsman Bungalow. Harold and Buelah Parrish.
  • 10 N. Fourth St., 1889, Late Victorian, John William “Blind” Boone house, named to the National Register of Historic Places in 2003. For all the recent media coverage, go to this page.
  • 14 S. Jefferson Road, Mexico, Missouri 65265 — This home is in Audrain County, but included here because it is the home of former Senator Kit Bond. 
  • 102 N. Glenwood Ave., 1919, Craftsman Bungalow. Henry and Lillian Kreutz Home.
  • 103 Hubbell Drive, ca. 1910. Anna Hubbell House. Named to Notable Properties 2015, see the newspaper coverage, video and supporting documents.
  • 104 Hubbell Drive, ca. 1924. Craftsman. J.B. and Cora Reno House. Named to Notable Properties 2015, see the newspaper coverage, video and supporting documents.
  • 105 Hubbell Drive, ca. 1927. Craftsman. Bettie H. (Nee Hubbell) House. Named to Notable Properties 2015, see the newspaper coverage, video and supporting documents.
  • 107 Hubbell Drive, ca. 1927. Craftsman. L.D. Walden House. Named to Notable Properties 2015, see the newspaper coverage, video and supporting documents.
  • 108 Hubbell Drive, ca. 1944. English Revival. Dell Rummans House. Named to Notable Properties 2015, see the newspaper coverage, video and supporting documents.
  • 109 Hubbell Drive, ca. 1927. Craftsman. H. Frank Stookey House. Named to Notable Properties 2015, see the newspaper coverage, video and supporting documents.
  • 110 Hubbell Drive, ca. 1927. Craftsman. Frank Ballenger House. Named to Notable Properties 2015, see the newspaper coverage, video and supporting documents.
  • 111 Hubbell Drive, ca. 1927. Craftsman. O.G. Jacobs House. Named to Notable Properties 2015, see the newspaper coverage, video and supporting documents.
  • 112 Hubbell Drive, ca. 1942. English Revival. John L. Ballenger House. Named to Notable Properties 2015, see the newspaper coverage, video and supporting documents.
  • 113 Hubbell Drive, ca. 1927. Craftsman. Esther and John Denham House. Named to Notable Properties 2015, see the newspaper coverage, video and supporting documents.
  • 114 Hubbell Drive, ca. 1927. Craftsman. Ardelia and Ann Jones House. Named to Notable Properties 2015, see the newspaper coverage, video and supporting documents.
  • 115 Hubbell Drive, ca. 1927. Craftsman. L.S. and Shelia Harless House. Named to Notable Properties 2015, see the newspaper coverage, video and supporting documents.
  • 111 S. Glenwood Ave., ca. 1908, Craftsman. James A. Hudson Home.
  • 121 N. West Boulevard, 1934-1941, Tudor Revival. The former log cabin of Arch and Blanche McHarg. Original log cabin elements are part of current structure. Named to the Notable Properties List in 2004. Read about the “Hansel and Gretel House,” in this Missouri Life article. As of June 6, 2015, this house is for sale again.
  • 201 S. Glenwood Ave. ca. 1929, Georgian Revival, Mary Garth Gordon.
  • 201 E. Brandon Road, built 1937. Colonial Revival. Margaret and Sidney Neate Home.
  • 202 S. Glenwood Ave., ca. 1918, Colonial Revival. Home of Hulda and Walter Williams, the founder of the School of Journalism at the University of Missouri. Named to Notable Properties List in 2004.
  • 206 Bingham Road, 1928, Tudor Revival. Harry Satterlee and Florence Henderson. For more information, see these this article from 2012 when this home was named to the Notable Properties List: Six properties to be honored by Columbia’s Historic Preservation Commission.
  • 206 S. Glenwood Ave., ca. 1909, Colonial Revival. Laura Matthews home.
  • 211 Westwood Ave., built 1911, Craftsman. George Reeder house. Read more about the house in this article, Honoring historic homes published in Mizzou, magazine of the Mizzou Alumni Association.
  • 211 Bingham, ca. 1927. Georgian Revival. Margaret von Holtzendorff. Named to Notable Properties in 2010.
  • 211 Westwood Ave., ca. 1911, Craftsman. George Reeder. Named to the Notable Properties list in 2008 according to this Jan. 26, 2008 article published in the Columbia Business Times.
  • 213 S. Glenwood Ave., 1916, Colonial Revival. Note: According to supporting documentation, addresses changed over the years; this used to be 107 S. Glenwood in the 1910s.) George P. Brauer. Named to Notable Properties 2015, see the newspaper coverage, video and supporting documents.
  • 214 St. Joseph St., ca. 1903, Late Victorian. George Harrell Jr. Home. At one time, Harrell ran a dry cleaning business at the rear of the property. Named to the Notable Properties list in 2008 according to this Jan. 26, 2008 article published in the Columbia Business Times, written by Mike Martin.
  • 216 S. Fifth St. — This is not on any list, but here is some coverage of it: March 30, 2017 — A rich past, a hazy future, Columbia Missourian. Summary: Article about the house at 216 S. Fifth St., in the shadow of student housing being built. Includes some history of the house and former resident Brian Matney, and owners of the property Adam Dushoff, Jeremy Brown and Matt Jenn.
  • 300 N. Tenth St., ca. 1882, Italianate. Samuel H. and Isabel Elkins House.
  • 300 S. Glenwood Ave., ca. 1920, Georgian Revival. Ruby M. Hulen House. Two-story brick home of Georgian style that was designed by a visiting professor from England.
  • 302 Westwood Ave., 1909, Colonial Revival. Ralph Harris.
  • 313 E. Brandon Road, ca. 1940. Colonial Revival. Newell S. and Fern R. Gingrich.
  • 401 West Blvd., South. Note the strange address. West Boulevard was once the western edge of Columbia, Missouri, which is why the street was named West Boulevard. This home was named to the 2017 Most Notable Properties List. It is the original house on a 187-acre farm.
  • 404 Thilly Ave., 1910, Craftsman. Robert and Ivy Selvidge Home.
  • 503 Edgewood Ave., 1910 ca., Craftsman. W.C. Davidson House.
  • 504 Westmount, 1906, Craftsman. One of the three “Peanut Brittle,” houses, this one was built by Winterton C. Curtis The “Peanut brittle” houses were all built using unorthodox construction methods, e.g. exteriors 7-inch-thick concrete blocks with small rocks embedded in them.
  • 509 Thilly Ave., ca 1909, Craftsman Foursquare. Emma and Lincoln Hyde. Lincoln Hyde was a professor of bridge engineering at the University of Missouri. The four square brick structure includes lower level exterior walls three bricks thick while the second floor is two bricks thick.  The limestone used for the foundation was mined from the same site as that used to create MU’s White Campus. Read more about the house in this article, Honoring historic homes published in Mizzou, magazine of the Mizzou Alumni Association. It was named to the Notable Properties list in 2008 according to this Jan. 26, 2008 article published in the Columbia Business Times.
  • 511 S. Glenwood Ave., ca. 1916, Colonial Revival. William A. Miller.
  • 511 Westwood Ave., ca. 1916, Craftsman. Grace and Dr. Edwin B. Branson. Dr. Edwin Branson was the chairman of the Geology Department at the University of Missouri in the early 1900s.  The house is built of gunnite, a type of mortar conveyed through a hose at high velocity. The interior and exterior decorative features include wrought iron from New Orleans. Read more about the house in this article, Honoring historic homes published in Mizzou, magazine of the Mizzou Alumni Association. Named to the Notable Properties list in 2008 according to this article published Jan. 26, 2008 in the Columbia Business Times.
  • 600 S. Glenwood Ave., 1914. Note: According to the supporting documentation, the street address changed over the years. This used to be 300 S. Glenwood.) Style: Varied. W.W. and Jessie Allen Charters House. Named to Notable Historic Properties 2015. Named to Notable Properties 2015, see the newspaper coverage, video and supporting documents.
  • 602 Sanford Place, ca. 1869, Italianate. Sanford and Kate Conley House. It is on the University of Missouri Campus. Here’s a link to an 1890 photo of the house.
  • 606 S. College Ave. This is the Gathering Place B&B until December 2017.
  • 608 Westmount, 1906, Craftsman. One of the three “Peanut Brittle,” houses.
  • 610 W. Broadway, ca. 1921, Craftsman. A. Fredendall. Named to the Most Notable Properties list in 2011. It was built by A. Fredendall, pioneer Columbia clothier and merchant. It was later owned by the H.R. Mueller family, which owned and operated the HRMueller Florist Co, according to the West Broadway Historic District Property Information Form prepared by Debbie Sheals, which is available online here.  Read more about the house in this Feb. 15, 2011 Columbia Missourian article.
  • 611 W. Worley, ca. 1904, Late Victorian. James and Suzie Ridgeway Home. Vernacular interpretation of Gothic Revival style.
  • 700 W. Broadway, ca. 1908, Late Victorian. John A. and Clara Stewart home.
  • 700 Mount Vernon, ca. 1911, Colonial Revival. Robert and Lura Tandy. A 2-story farmhouse, the south side of the home was the original front, and then had an Amelia Street address.
  • 703 Ingleside Drive, ca. 1926, Spanish Eclectic. W.J. and Clara Lhamon House. Named to the Columbia Most Notable Properties list in 2013. See the article about that here.
  • 703 Westmount, ca. 1909, Craftsman. W.D.A. and Frederica Westfall Home.
  • 704 Westmount, 1906, Craftsman. One of the three “Peanut Brittle,” houses.
  • 709 W. Broadway, ca. 1920, Colonial Revival. Eugene Heidman House, once owned by E.F. Heidman, owner of long-time downtown drug store Peck’s Drug Store. Named to the Notable Property List in 2004.
  • 710 Westmount, noted in this article published Jan. 26, 2008 in the Columbia Business Times written by Mike Martin.
  • 711 Thilly Ave., 1959, Mid-Century Modern. Perry and Ella Phillips Home. Contemporary style by architect Harris Armstrong.
  • 716 W. Broadway, 1909, Colonial Revival. John and Elizabeth Taylor House, placed on National Register of Historic Places in 2001. The house was once a bed and breakfast, but was closed in 2012. It is now a private home.
  • 803 Alton Ave, ca. 1914, Vernacular. Harvey and Eugenia Wieghtman House.
  • 809 S. Providence Road, ca. 1878, Classical Revival. George and Margaret Rollins.
  • 818 W. Rollins Road, ca. 1910, Queen Anne. A.W. and Bernadine Blanks.
  • 823 Crestland Drive, nominated but not selected to the 2017 Most Notable Properties List.
  • 901 N. Rangeline St., ca. 1920, Craftsman Foursquare. F.T. and Masie Leebrick House.
  • 903 S. Providence Road, ca., 1929, Colonial Revival. Charles and Reginia McGinley home.
  • 905 S. Providence Road, 1925,Tudor Revival. Bessie W. and Dr. J.E. Thornton. Named to Notable Properties in 2014.
  • 915 S. Providence Road, ca. 1928, Colonial Revival. Orville and Maude Barnett House.
  • 916 W. Stewart Road, 1932, Tudor Revival. Claude and Stella Woolsey House. Named to the Columbia Most Notable Properties list in 2013. See the article about that here.
  • 917 Edgewood Ave., 1952, Mid-Century Modern. T.W. and Elizabeth Bretz.
  • 917 S. Providence Road, ca. 1938, Colonial Revival. Victoria D. and Elmer H. Almquist.
  • 920 Cherry St., c. 1837, Niedermeyer Apartments with its 30 apartments is, in effect, many homes. Named to 2013 Columbia Notable Properties List.
  • 923 S. Providence Road, 1954, Ranch. Donald S. and Mary A. Chaney House.
  • 927 S. Providence Road, ca. 1941, Colonial Revival. Sen. Roy D. and Nellie M. Miller House.
  • 929 S. Providence Road, ca. 1939, Colonial Revival. J.E. and Fannie M. Bardelmeier House.
  • 1003 Sunset Drive. Nominated but not selected for the 2017 Most Notable Properties List.
  • 1115 Locust St., named to the Notable Properties list in 2008 according to this Jan. 26, 2008 article published in the Columbia Business Times.
  • 1201 E. Walnut St., ca. 1913. Late Victorian. J.G. Armistead House. Named to Notable Properties 2015, see the newspaper coverage, video and supporting documents.
  • 1203 E. Walnut St., ca. 1913. Colonial Revival. Leta Miller House. Named to Notable Properties 2015, see the newspaper coverage, video and supporting documents.
  • 1205 E. Walnut St., ca. 1910. Late Victorian. J.W. Sapp House. Named to Notable Properties 2015, see the newspaper coverage, video and supporting documents.
  • 1223 Frances Drive. Named to the 2017 Most Notable Properties List. This is the home of Axie and Darwin Hindman. Darwin Hindman was the mayor of Columbia from 1995-2010, a 15-year stretch. Read more about his time in office in this Columbia Daily Tribune article from April 26, 2010.
  • 1252 Sunset Drive, ca., 1939, Cape Cod. Albert and Thelma Trombly House. Built by a former member of the English Department at the University of Missouri.
  • 1312 W. Broadway, 1840s-1892, Italiante I-House. Edward Camplin House. Started as a log cabin before becoming Booneslick Inn and the Springdale House. Named to the Notable Properties List in 2004.
  • 1315 University Ave., ca. 1926, Craftsman. Harry B. Roth. See more at this page, 1315 University Ave., on ColumbiaHistoricHomes.com
  • DEMOLISHED – 2013 — 1404 E. Broadway, 1905, Late Victorian. Olive and Kennard Chandler. See this article, June 5, 2014, More ‘historic’ Columbia properties demolished in 2013, Columbia Daily Tribune, for more information about why it was demolished
  • 1411 Anthony St., 1906, Dutch Colonial revival-style. Arthur and Susie Buchroeder House. Named to the Columbia Most Notable Properties list in 2013. See the article about that here.
  • 1415 University Ave. Once the Phi Mu sorority house.
  • 1502 Anthony St., 1939, Tudor Revival. Francis Pike House. Named to Notable Properties in 2014.
  • 1506 University Ave. Nominated but not named to the 2017 Most Notable Properties List.
  • 1508 Ross St. Nominated by not named to the 2017 Most Notable Properties List.
  • 1516 Wilson Avenue, circa 1916. Colonial Revival. Walter and Helen Guthrie Miller House.
  • 1526 Wilson Ave., ca. 1916, Colonial Revival. Walter and Helen Guthrie.
  • 1601 Stoney Brook Place, ca., 1876, Vernacular I-House. County Infirmary Building. This home may be Boone County’s oldest home according to this Feb. 5, 2008, Columbia Missourian article. According to city records, the land was purchased in 1854 by the court from Murdock and Anne Garrett to establish a county infirmary or poor farm for the county’s indigent citizens.  The infirmary was erected in 1864 and was maintained by the county until 1898 when the land property was sold to J.B. Turner. This property represents the 100th selection of Most Notable Property by the Historic Preservation Commission.
  • 1602 Hinkson Ave., ca. 1906. Queen Anne/Dutch. Joseph and Mary Duncan House. Named to the Most Notable Properties List in 2011. See this Feb. 15, 2011 Columbia Missourian article.
  • 1619 University Ave. Nominated but not named to the 2017 Notable Properties List.
  • 1620 Hinkson Ave., ca. 1895, Queen Anne. Sally Flood House. She was one of Columbia’s first primary school teachers. One of only a few Queen Anne-style Victorian homes in Columbia. Named to the Notable Properties List in 2004.
  • 1719 University Ave., ca. 1938, Colonial Revival. Merle M. and Grace Prunty. Named to the Notable Properties List in 2007, per this article published in the Columbia Business Times written by Mike Martin.
  • 1844 Cliff Drive, ca. 1950, Mid-Century Modern. David and Helen Pinkney House. November 2013 — Columbia, The Beautiful by Morgan McCarty. Inside Columbia. Outlines the architectural finds in Columbia.
  • 1863 Cliff Drive, ca. 1950. Mid-Century Modern. Mary Coleman home.
  • 2007 S. Country Club Drive, ca. 1927, Tudor Revival. Built by Barry McAlester, son of A.W. McAlester, who helped develop MU’s School of Medicine. The McAlester’s family crest presides over a living room which showcases a fireplace adorned with limestone carvings. The dining room features hand-painted wall paper, according to this article, Honoring historic homes published in Mizzou, magazine of the Mizzou Alumni Association. The home across the street, 2000 S. Country Club Drive, once stood on this spot. Barry McAlester moved that home which he’d also built so he could build this home on what he considered the better location.
  • 2011 N. Country Club Drive, ca. 1883. Second Empire. Built for Dr. Andrew W. McAlester as a part of his 160 acre farm. McAlester helped develop MU’s School of Medicine. The stone gates at the head of Country Club Drive served as his entrance and the entire County Club area was a part of his farm. The house consists of oak framing with cedar lap siding on a concrete brick foundation. Read more about the house in this article, Honoring historic homes published in Mizzou, magazine of the Mizzou Alumni Association. Named to the Notable Properties list in 2008 according to this Jan. 26, 2008 article published in the Columbia Business Times.
  • 2815 Oakland Gravel Road, ca. 1862, Italianate. The David Guitar House, later became known as Confederate Hill. Named to the National Register of Historic Places on Sept. 9, 1993. This home is currently owned by Pat Westhoff and Elena Vega who purchased it on Oct. 18, 2010 at absolute auction for $155,500. The house previously had been on the market for $499,000. According to this Oct. 4, 2012 article, Slave cabins in Boone County, the property has a slave cabin on it.
    2911 Old 63 South, Annie Fisher House 031110

    2911 Old 63 South, Annie Fisher House DEMOLISHED, 2011.

      • 2911 Old Highway 63 South, 1925, Craftsman. Annie Fisher House. DEMOLISHED, 2011. Read more in this Nov. 29, 2011 article in the Columbia Daily Tribune. This link will take you to a photo of the house. For more information, click here. Annie Fisher, the daughter of slaves, became one of Columbia’s first African-American business owners. She operated a restaurant and catering service out of this house, which was named to Columbia’s Notable Properties list in 2009.
      • 3005 Mexico Gravel Road, 1827-1836, Federal I-House. Greenwood Heights. Read more about it on this Columbia Historic Homes page.
  • 3700 Ponderosa Drive, 1877, Italianate. Maplewood House. Named to the National Historic Register 4/13/1979. This house is open to the public for tours on open between Wednesdays and Sundays, noon – 3:30 p.m. from April 1 through Sept. 30, $5 adults, $3 kids under 16.
    For more information, call 573-443-8936 or click this link.  According to this Oct. 4, 2012 article, Slave cabins in Boone County, the property has a slave cabin on it.
  • 4713 Brown Station Road, ca. 1915. Vernacular. An auction was set for August 17, 2013 on this building which was built as Keene School, a two-story brick schoolhouse, with living quarters for the teacher on the second floor. Today, it is used as a residence. It was added to Columbia’s Notable Property list in 2004.
  • 3801 Ponderosa St., 1925, Vernacular. Shotgun house, formerly at Garth Avenue and Worley Streets, built circa 1925, recently moved to the developing outdoor museum at the Boone County Historical Society.
  • Gordon Manor, named to both lists at one time, was destroyed by fire in 1998 and demolished in 1999. It was near Stephens Lake, which is now within Stephens Lake Park operated by the City of Columbia’s Parks & Recreation Department.
  • 8939 W. Terrapin Hills Road. This ca. 1862-1903 house, built around a two-room 1832 log house, is on the National Register of Historic Places, but not on Columbia’s Notable Properties List, as it is not in the city.

One thought on “Homes

  1. Interesting information!

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