Black History, Cemeteries, CoMo200, Events, Missouri Preservation, Tours, Women

Events: Sandbagging, bicentennial, History Comes Alive

  • Today Wednesday, May 22, 2019 – until?  The Rocheport Merchants Association has posted on Facebook that volunteers to help sandbag are being sought. Check out the RMA’s Facebook page “>here
  • 5:30 p.m. Thursday, May 23, 2019 — Get involved now, enjoy the Bicentennial in 2021! Right now, the Mayor’s Task Force on the Bicentennial Celebration is making plans for our city’s 200th birthday. Every person’s input is needed to make this a truly inclusive event. The Taskforce’s next public meeting will be held in the Walton Building at 300 S. Providence Road. What? Haven’t heard about this upcoming big bash? The task force was launched in February of 2018.  It announced three goals for its plans: diversity, creating a lasting tribute to the 200 years of Columbia’s history and having a fun celebration.
  • 1-4 p.m. Monday, May 27, 2019 — History Comes Alive. This free, family friendly event is in its third year. Held at the Columbia Cemetery, the event features repeated performances all afternoon of experienced actors including Ed Hanson portraying well-known Columbians. Here’s a video of Cindy Mustard of Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery on Paul Pepper and Friends. This year’s event will include portrayals of entrepreneur and former slave Henry Kirklin, architect Mary Louise Hale Lafon, suffragist Helen Guthrie, businessman Jefferson Garth, educator and legislator David H. Hickman and entrepreneur Frederick Niedermeyer. This event is sponsored by Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery, a nonprofit.
  • June 19-June 21, 2019 — Missouri Preservation’s annual conference will be held in St. Joseph, Missouri this year. Missouri Preservation, also known as the Missouri Alliance for Historic Preservation. Headquartered in St. Louis, it is a nonprofit dedicated to education, advocacy and assistance. Its conferences highlight preservation efforts and provide education and networking opportunities. Anyone can attend. The conference costs between $75 and $230 depending on how much of the conference you plan to attend. Register here.
Black History, Cemeteries, Events, Get involved, Missouri Preservation, Tours

Coming up: Listening sessions, a party, cemetery history and state conference

  • 6 p.m., Tuesday, May 14, 2019, & 5:30 p.m., Tuesday, May 21 — Boone County is holding listening sessions to get community input for its bicentennial celebration. Here’s a news release about the May 14 listening session to be held in the Centralia City Hall Community Room at 114 S. Rollins St., in Centralia. Here’s a link to the news release about the May 21 session to be held in the Activity and Recreation Center (ARC), meeting room C at 1701 W. Ash St. in Columbia
  • The release states:
    “Local artist/educator Stacy Self (Wildy World) will be creating a large mural in the shape of Boone County that depicts 200 years of Boone County history. Self, well-known for her work creating murals as community collaborations, will divide the entire space into pieces, each representing distinct geographic sections of the County. For each piece, she will seek community input about what is unique and important about that area. Based on that input, Self will design the artwork and then the community will be invited to return and paint its portion of the mural. After all pieces are complete, they will be joined to form the “map” of Boone County, which will be on display during 2020 in the Boone County History & Culture Center. At the close of the Bicentennial Year, the pieces will be given to the communities that created them, where they will be displayed for posterity.” For more information, contact Janet Thompson at jthompson@boonecountymo.org or 573-886-4309.
  • 5-8 p.m. Saturday, May 18 — 155th Birthday Party for John William “Blind” Boone in the historic Boone house at 10 N. Fourth St. The free event will include food and music and an opportunity to see the stunning restoration of this Victorian home.
  • 5:30 p.m. Thursday, May 23, 2019 — The Mayor’s Task Force on the Bicentennial Celebration will meet in the Walton Building at 300 S. Providence Road. The task force is planning the celebration of Columbia’s 200th anniversary. The meeting is open to the public. The task force was launched in February of 2018.  It announced three goals for its plans: diversity, creating a lasting tribute to the 200 years of Columbia’s history and having a fun celebration.
  • 1-4 p.m. Monday, May 27, 2019 — History Comes Alive. This free, family friendly event is in its third year. Held at the Columbia Cemetery, the event features actors portraying well-known Columbians. This year’s roster includes agricultural entrepreneur Henry Kirklin, architect Mary Louise Hale Lafon, suffragist Helen Guthrie, businessman Jefferson Garth, educator and legislator David H. Hickman and entrepreneur Frederick Niedermeyer. This event is sponsored by Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery, a nonprofit.
  • June 19-June 21, 2019 — Missouri Preservation annual conference in St. Joseph, Missouri. Each year, Missouri Preservation, a state nonprofit dedicated to education, advocacy and assistance, holds a conference. The conference highlights preservation efforts and provides education and networking opportunities. Anyone can attend. The conference costs between $75 and $230 depending on how much of the conference you plan to attend. Register here. The organization’s full name is the Missouri Alliance for Historic Preservation and it is headquartered in St. Louis.

 

Areas, Commercial Buildings, Tours

1978 look at Broadway, Seventh and Ninth streets

Miller Shoe Store, 800 East Broadway, courtesy the City of Columbia
800 E. Broadway in 2002. What was there before? A 1978 report will tell you. Photo courtesy the City of Columbia

Want to take a walk through the past? This 1978 historic survey report on Columbia’s buildings on Broadway, Seventh and Ninth streets and it reads like a walk through time, describing the buildings as they were in 1978 — and what they once looked like and what was there before then.

For example, the report on 720 E. Broadway, now Central Bank of Boone County, states the building once sported bronze doors.

The report goes on to state in 1889, the lot was home to a carriage factory and harness shop. Between 1889 and 1895, a three-story brick building on that spot housed “various smithys, groceries and lodge halls,” the report states. “In 1916 these two buildings were demolished for the present Boone County Bank.”

The report contains a page or two on each building on Broadway, some on Seventh and Ninth streets, pictures and citations to newspaper and other publications.

So download the report, print it out and if the weather ever cools down, take a walk through the past and try to see what was once there and what’s left behind.

Cemeteries, Columbia College, Events, Sacred Spaces, Stephens College, Tours, University of Missouri, Women

MU’s first female journalism graduate portrayed

The late Mary Paxton Keeley spoke from the beyond through an event sponsored by the Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery.

Keeley, MU’s first female journalism graduate, said through this interpretive event she was on the steps in 1909 when Walter Williams opened the doors to the what is reported to be the world’s first School of Journalism.

She described her work at the Kansas City Post, as well as her teaching journalism and creative writing at Christian College, now Columbia College, and how she once bicycled through the streets of Columbia before her death at 100.

Other famous Columbia residents portrayed and videos of the performances were posted on the Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery Facebook page.

Here are the names and links to the videos on YouTube:

Other portrayed were Victor Barth, Richard Henry Jesse and Robert Beverly Price

The scripts were written by Chris Campbell, executive director of the Boone County History and Culture Center. The event was sponsored by the Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery.

See the news coverage of the event for more information:

May 28, 2018 — Columbia Cemetery comes alive for Memorial Day, KOMU.com. Summary: Re-enactors at Columbia’s oldest cemetery portrayed historical figures buried there including James L. Stephens, Victor Barth, Richard Henry Jesse, Mary Paxton Keeley, John Lange Sr., Robert Beverly Price and Brig. Gen. Oden Guitar. The event was sponsored by the Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery.

May 28, 2018 — Columbia residents learn when History Comes Alive, Columbia Missourian. Summary: Hundreds attended the second annual History Comes Alive event at the Columbia Cemetery.

Events, Historical Homes, National Register of Historic Places, Tours

Reincarnation, historic homes and a free festival

Did you ever notice that anyone who talks about a past life was always a princess or a pharaoh? Yeah, me too.

But I’m firmly convinced that if I did have a past life it was lived as a common laborer or simple farm wife. That’s why I’ll be in the Ryland House as a volunteer at this weekend’s free Heritage Festival.

The Heritage Festival will be from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 17 and 18 at Historic Nifong Park, 3700 Ponderosa St. This free event will include demonstrations, dancing, crafts and … yes! Tours of the buildings at the Village at Boone Junction, a sweet little collection of Boone County historic buildings including the Ryland House.

The Ryland House was built around 1880 and moved to the Junction in 2005. It’s a small place, about 800 square feet and was originally owned by a well off farm family, William and Maggie Ryland. They farmed about 358 acres near Sturgeon.

The tour of the house won’t last long — it’s only three rooms. Yes, despite the fact that the family that owned this house had a nice sized, well-run farm, their house consisted of three rooms, a large kitchen, a bedroom, and a parlor used mainly when visitors came by.

I won’t be in the parlor during my time volunteering in the Ryland House. I’ll be in the kitchen, where I’m sure my ancestors and any former incarnations of myself would have been. And you can come visit me there, too, on Sunday morning.

But what if you were a princess or someone wealthy in a past life. No worries. You’ll be able to get a peek at the life of those better off in Boone County during a tour of the Maplewood House.

The fine two-story house was the home of Lavinia Lenoir and Dr. Frank G. Nifong. It was built by Miss Lavinia’s father, Slater Ensor Lenoir around 1877, and the nine-room house is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Maplewood, unlike the Ryland House, features a music room, a dining room, several bedrooms as well as a parlor, a kitchen and even a maid’s or sewing room.

So no matter what your inclination is about a past life, in the present you can straddle past and present at the Heritage Festival this weekend.