Black History, Cemeteries, CoMo200, Events, Missouri Preservation, Tours, Women

Events: Sandbagging, bicentennial, History Comes Alive

  • Today Wednesday, May 22, 2019 – until?  The Rocheport Merchants Association has posted on Facebook that volunteers to help sandbag are being sought. Check out the RMA’s Facebook page “>here
  • 5:30 p.m. Thursday, May 23, 2019 — Get involved now, enjoy the Bicentennial in 2021! Right now, the Mayor’s Task Force on the Bicentennial Celebration is making plans for our city’s 200th birthday. Every person’s input is needed to make this a truly inclusive event. The Taskforce’s next public meeting will be held in the Walton Building at 300 S. Providence Road. What? Haven’t heard about this upcoming big bash? The task force was launched in February of 2018.  It announced three goals for its plans: diversity, creating a lasting tribute to the 200 years of Columbia’s history and having a fun celebration.
  • 1-4 p.m. Monday, May 27, 2019 — History Comes Alive. This free, family friendly event is in its third year. Held at the Columbia Cemetery, the event features repeated performances all afternoon of experienced actors including Ed Hanson portraying well-known Columbians. Here’s a video of Cindy Mustard of Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery on Paul Pepper and Friends. This year’s event will include portrayals of entrepreneur and former slave Henry Kirklin, architect Mary Louise Hale Lafon, suffragist Helen Guthrie, businessman Jefferson Garth, educator and legislator David H. Hickman and entrepreneur Frederick Niedermeyer. This event is sponsored by Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery, a nonprofit.
  • June 19-June 21, 2019 — Missouri Preservation’s annual conference will be held in St. Joseph, Missouri this year. Missouri Preservation, also known as the Missouri Alliance for Historic Preservation. Headquartered in St. Louis, it is a nonprofit dedicated to education, advocacy and assistance. Its conferences highlight preservation efforts and provide education and networking opportunities. Anyone can attend. The conference costs between $75 and $230 depending on how much of the conference you plan to attend. Register here.
Black History, Cemeteries, Events, Get involved, Missouri Preservation, Tours

Coming up: Listening sessions, a party, cemetery history and state conference

  • 6 p.m., Tuesday, May 14, 2019, & 5:30 p.m., Tuesday, May 21 — Boone County is holding listening sessions to get community input for its bicentennial celebration. Here’s a news release about the May 14 listening session to be held in the Centralia City Hall Community Room at 114 S. Rollins St., in Centralia. Here’s a link to the news release about the May 21 session to be held in the Activity and Recreation Center (ARC), meeting room C at 1701 W. Ash St. in Columbia
  • The release states:
    “Local artist/educator Stacy Self (Wildy World) will be creating a large mural in the shape of Boone County that depicts 200 years of Boone County history. Self, well-known for her work creating murals as community collaborations, will divide the entire space into pieces, each representing distinct geographic sections of the County. For each piece, she will seek community input about what is unique and important about that area. Based on that input, Self will design the artwork and then the community will be invited to return and paint its portion of the mural. After all pieces are complete, they will be joined to form the “map” of Boone County, which will be on display during 2020 in the Boone County History & Culture Center. At the close of the Bicentennial Year, the pieces will be given to the communities that created them, where they will be displayed for posterity.” For more information, contact Janet Thompson at jthompson@boonecountymo.org or 573-886-4309.
  • 5-8 p.m. Saturday, May 18 — 155th Birthday Party for John William “Blind” Boone in the historic Boone house at 10 N. Fourth St. The free event will include food and music and an opportunity to see the stunning restoration of this Victorian home.
  • 5:30 p.m. Thursday, May 23, 2019 — The Mayor’s Task Force on the Bicentennial Celebration will meet in the Walton Building at 300 S. Providence Road. The task force is planning the celebration of Columbia’s 200th anniversary. The meeting is open to the public. The task force was launched in February of 2018.  It announced three goals for its plans: diversity, creating a lasting tribute to the 200 years of Columbia’s history and having a fun celebration.
  • 1-4 p.m. Monday, May 27, 2019 — History Comes Alive. This free, family friendly event is in its third year. Held at the Columbia Cemetery, the event features actors portraying well-known Columbians. This year’s roster includes agricultural entrepreneur Henry Kirklin, architect Mary Louise Hale Lafon, suffragist Helen Guthrie, businessman Jefferson Garth, educator and legislator David H. Hickman and entrepreneur Frederick Niedermeyer. This event is sponsored by Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery, a nonprofit.
  • June 19-June 21, 2019 — Missouri Preservation annual conference in St. Joseph, Missouri. Each year, Missouri Preservation, a state nonprofit dedicated to education, advocacy and assistance, holds a conference. The conference highlights preservation efforts and provides education and networking opportunities. Anyone can attend. The conference costs between $75 and $230 depending on how much of the conference you plan to attend. Register here. The organization’s full name is the Missouri Alliance for Historic Preservation and it is headquartered in St. Louis.

 

Columbia Historic Preservation Commission, Events, Get involved, Historic Preservation Commission, Missouri Preservation, Missouri State Historical Society

Events: African American newspapers, National Register changes, State preservation conference

Mark your calendar:

  • 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 30 — The African American Press in Missouri, a lecture about African American newspapers in Missouri. The presentation will be given by Debra Foster Greene, Lincoln University professor emerita of history. From 1875 to 1970, Missouri had more than 60 black-owned newspapers. The event is free and will be held in the Stotler Lounge in the Memorial Student Union. It will start with light refreshment at 6 p.m., with the lecture at 6:30 p.m. and an opportunity to meet Greene at 7:30 p.m. This event is sponsored by the State Historical Society of Missouri.
  • 11:59 p.m. (E.T.) Tuesday, April 30 — Deadline to comment on changes to the National Register of Historic Places. According to this April 26, 2019 article in Forbes magazine, new rules are to be put in place that will make it more difficult to have places placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Being on the Register does not protect a property fro demolition, but it can make it eligible for tax incentives. The two changes call for making it possible for one landowner within an area to “override the consensus of the population of an entire district.” It would also change the rules for nominating properties that are controlled by Federal agencies, making it impossible for local agencies to “advocate for sites within their own communities.”
  • 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 7, 2019 — The Historic Preservation Commission of the city of Columbia will hold its regular monthly meeting in Conference Room 1B in City Hall at 701 E. Broadway. The HPC is designed to educate and inform the community about the city’s “historical, archeological and architectural heritage,” according to the city’s website. The HPC also “investigates and recommends to the Council the adoption of ordinances…” Meetings of the HPC are open to the public.
  • June 19-21, 2019 — Registration for the Missouri Preservation’s annual conference is open. The event will be held in St. Joseph, Missouri and work sessions range from saving brick buildings to tax credits to window restoration and repair. The event is $75 for one day, $150 for two days and $230 for the entire event. Missouri Preservation is a nonprofit organization dedicated to education, advocation and assistance. Transparency note: I attended this event last year and found it education and valuable.
Events, Missouri Preservation

Skip Valentine flowers, book history instead

What about some history and a getaway for Valentine’s Day instead of flowers and the usual? That’s what I’ll be doing with my sweetie. (And we’re even getting a deal on it!)

We’ll be starting with a fundraiser 5:30 – 9 p.m. on Feb. 15 in St. Louis for Missouri Preservation, a nonprofit that advocates and works toward historical preservation. It’s a day after the big heart holiday, but I don’t care. The tickets are $35 each and that will include drinks and snacks — and a chance to get inside the restored 1893 eye-popping building at 705 Olive St.

The Louis Sullivan designed building has undergone a $55 million renovation by Restoration St. Louis, according to this Sept. 22, 2018 St. Louis Post-Dispatch article.

Now it’s a Marriott Hotel Saint Louis, only four blocks from the Gateway Arch.

And we’re getting to stay in this $250-$300 a night hotel for $149 that night. Missouri Preservation has obtained a room block so you can sign up for the fundraiser, get a Valentine’s date event and a overnight-get-away history trip all rolled into one. (Yeah, that’s how I sold it to my husband.)

The building was referred to as “lavishly adorned” and “largely unchanged on the outside,” in this Jan. 8, 2016 article in NextStl.com. The article includes current and historic photographs including a view of the second story round windows.

We’ll be staying overnight and taking in the Gateway Museum, only four blocks away, which underwent a $176.4 million renovation, according to this July 1, 2018 St. Louis Post-Dispatch article.

Seriously, for Valentine’s Day, you can spend on a $100 bouquet for your beloved, eat out in a crowded noisy restaurant for another $50 — or you can stay overnight in St. Louis, contribute to an organization working toward saving our history and get away overnight for somewhat more money but a whole lot more fun. (At least for history nuts like me … )

And bonus! You can pat yourself on the back for a unique approach to the whole hearts and flowers holiday.

See you there.

Events, Get involved, Historic Hours, Missouri Preservation

Hate change? St. Louis event might change your mind

I’m going to admit it: I hate change. But an event set in St. Louis on Friday, July 20, 2018 has me rethinking my attitude.

From 5-8 p.m., a Missouri Preservation fundraiser will be held in the Arcade Building at 800 Olive St., in St. Louis, and the event will include rooftop views of the Arch, music, an open bar and appetizers.

Vacant for nearly 30 years, the former office/retail block is now an apartment complex with commercial space — with special appeal to artists.  The National Historic Landmark building includes more than 11,000 square feet of shared work and studio spaces including a “music and multi-media studio, and music practice rooms, ” according to the Arcade website.

One of the commercial residents is Webster University’s Gateway Campus. It occupies 54,000 square feet of the building, according to this Oct. 3, 2017 news release from Webster University.

Ideas for change in Columbia?

OK, so maybe I am learning to like change. Maybe you can, too. What kind of change like this would you like to see in Columbia?

Ready to get in the car?

This event is a fundraiser for Missouri Preservation, a nonprofit historic preservation organization. The cost is $30 for Missouri Preservation members and $40 for nonmembers. What do you get for this? The event will include tours of the award-winning renovated 1919 building called a “Gothic Revival skyscraper.” It also will include music performed by Sarah Jane and the Blue Notes, and an open bar and appetizers from Urban Eats.

Can’t go, but you still want to see it?

This June 6, 2018 post on the National Association of Home Builders site will give you a sweet peek. The NAHB awarded the Arcade Apartments with not one, but two awards.

In 2017, the Arcade was named the Multifamily Pillars of the Industry Award winner in the “Best Affordable Apartment Community (Over 100 units)” category, said Crystal Jackson of the NAHB via an email. Jackson is the association’s director of multifamily and 55plus housing.  She added, “The Arcade was also a finalist in the “Best Adaptive Reuse” category in 2017.”

Here’s a peek at the project as it was underway via this Dec. 23, 2015 article in the St. Louis Business Journal.

So what kinds of renovations for buildings would you like to see in Columbia? 

 

 

 

Get involved, Missouri Preservation

You can help save history

Each year, Missouri Preservation announces a list of buildings that are in peril of being lost. The deadline for nominations is Aug. 31, 2018.

You can be the eyes and ears of Missouri Preservation, a nonprofit dedicated to preserving Missouri’s unique architectural and historic landmarks.

No need to be an expert. The form is easy to fill out and you can download it here.

Why get involved? If you’ve ever driven by something and wondered what happened to the building that used to be there, you’ve experienced a loss of our history. Sure, not every building deserves to be saved, but we all know the lyrics about tearing down paradise to put up a parking lot.

Location and timing matters

In 2010, a view of 2911 Old 63 S., Annie Fisher home, demolished 2011.
In 2010, a view of 2911 Old 63 S., Annie Fisher home, demolished 2011.

Sometimes a building ends up being demolished because it’s in the wrong place at the wrong time. That’s what I like to think caused the loss of the Annie Fisher’s house on 2911 Old 63 South. The grand building was once the site of Fair Oaks, the restaurant of Annie Fisher, one of Columbia’s first African-American businesswomen. Learn more about Fisher here, including information on the houses she owned that still exist, via this article by the Columbia Tribune published May 20, 2015.

When she operated her business there, it was in the countryside of Boone County. Then Columbia grew and the house was zoned commercial and with a storage operation next door, few people wanted the huge house with all those windows that Fisher loved so much because they allowed her to see the beautiful countryside. The house was demolished in 2011, according to this Columbia Tribune article published Nov. 29, 2011.

Fisher’s home is gone but others don’t have to follow it. Nominate a building or place to Missouri’s Historic Places in Peril by Aug. 31, 2018 to give an old building a chance.

Background on Places in Peril

Originally called Most Endangered, the Places in Peril started off in 2000 as a media campaign designed to highlight endangered buildings. In 2015, the program was rebranded Places in Peril. As the Missouri Preservation website states, “Once the historic resource is gone, it’s gone forever. By publicizing these places we hope to build support towards each property’s eventual preservation.”

Start looking — Aug. 31, 2018 will be here before you know it.

Events, Missouri Preservation

Apply now! Preservation conference scholarships available until April 9 close of business

I wanted to headline this as free money because it sounds so exciting to me.

Turns out there are 10 scholarships still available for the 2018 Missouri Preservation Conference set for May 2-4 in Sedalia. You have until the end of business on Monday, April 9 to apply. Go here to find the link to the application.

Here is all the info on the conference itself.

So what’s included? 

This is a $280 value. According to a recent email from Missouri Preservation the scholarships will cover “registration, meals, snacks, field sessions and networking opportunities, and … reimbursement for hotel expenses for the three-day conference.”

The scholarships are available to any citizen within a Certified Local Government (CLG) and g

uess what — Columbia’s included. Here’s a list of all the CLGs.

OK, I’m going to be honest here. The application notes that first preference is for preservation consultants, commissioners and local preservation staff members but it also includes citizens so I say go for the scholarship. I’m going to apply myself because nothing ventured, nothing gained, right?

So why should you go?

dianna2-001I don’t have to tell you what thrills me. I’ve been blogging about historic places for eight years, so this workshop caught my eye: “House story: How to Research Sites and Structures.” But the three-day conference is filled with presentations ranging from working with real estate agents to engaging public investment and protection.

If those presentations aren’t enough to get you to Sedalia, the keynote speaker is Briana Grosicki, of PlaceEconomics. It’s a Washington, D.C.-based consulting firm that, as the website states, “works at the nexus of economic and historic preservation.” Now who isn’t concerned with money these days? She’s the head of research at PlaceEconomics, so she’ll be talking facts and figures, not opinions and wishes.

Gotta go and make out my application for a scholarship! See you in Sedalia?