Black History, Cemeteries, CoMo200, Events, Get involved, Historic Hours, Historic Preservation Commission, News Roundup, Sacred Spaces, Women

Events: Park meeting, preservation, DNA, birthday party and cemetery gets lively

Get out the slow cooker and shuffle your take-out menus, you’re going to be busy this month!

  • 7 p.m. Monday, May 6, 2019 — Columbia City Council is meeting and the expansion of Flat Branch Park is up for discussion. The meeting will be held in Council Chambers at 701 E. Broadway. How’s history connected here? The park expansion is part of plans to celebrate Columbia’s bicentennial in 2021, and park construction is set to start next year. At the heart of the matter is more parking for the commercial building at Providence and Broadway owned by Mark Stevenson. The building is the former Ice House, which has been at the heart of a building controversy before. The building has been saved, but now the question is how much parking where. Tonight’s meeting will cover the four different options highlighted in this article, “Parking spaces at center of debate in Flat Branch Park expansion project,” published in the Columbia Missourian on May 5, 2019.
  • 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 7, 2018DNA for Genealogists, a program featuring international genealogy consultant Kathleen Brandt will be held at the Columbia Public Library. Free and open to the public, the event announcement states Brandt will help people unscramble DNA which test might be right for you and help people look for their ancestry including Native American or Jewish ancestry.
  • 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 7, 2019Historic Preservation Commission meeting. in Conference Room 1C at City Hall. This group helps guide the city’s preservation efforts. It meets monthly and topics on this month’s agenda include demolition permits, a follow up on 917, 919 W. Broadway and 14 N. West Blvd., and plans for a window workshop. This meeting is open to the public.
  • 5-8 p.m. Saturday, May 18155th Birthday Party for John William “Blind” Boone in the historic Boone house at 10 N. Fourth St. The free event will include food and music and an opportunity to see the stunning restoration of this Victorian home.
  • 1-4 p.m. Monday, May 27, 2019History Comes Alive. This free, family friendly event is in its third year. Held at the Columbia Cemetery, the event features actors portraying well-known Columbians. This year’s roster includes agricultural entrepreneur Henry Kirklin, architect Mary Louise Hale Lafon, suffragist Helen Guthrie, businessman Jefferson Garth, educator and legislator David H. Hickman and entrepreneur Frederick Niedermeyer. This event is sponsored by Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery, a nonprofit.

 

Events, Historic Hours, Historical Homes

Jefferson City home tour Sunday, Sept. 23

Here’s a nearby opportunity in Jefferson City to see inside some historic homes. This historic homes tour will be 1-5 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 23, 2018. Tickets are $15 the day of the event and can be purchased at the Historic City of Jefferson City tent at 1122 Moreau Drive, Jefferson City. (Note: Only cash or checks will be accepted.)

Take a drive and take the tour — then let the readers of ColumbiaHistoricHomes.com know in the comments if there are any similar homes in Columbia.

Events, Get involved, Historic Hours, Missouri Preservation

Hate change? St. Louis event might change your mind

I’m going to admit it: I hate change. But an event set in St. Louis on Friday, July 20, 2018 has me rethinking my attitude.

From 5-8 p.m., a Missouri Preservation fundraiser will be held in the Arcade Building at 800 Olive St., in St. Louis, and the event will include rooftop views of the Arch, music, an open bar and appetizers.

Vacant for nearly 30 years, the former office/retail block is now an apartment complex with commercial space — with special appeal to artists.  The National Historic Landmark building includes more than 11,000 square feet of shared work and studio spaces including a “music and multi-media studio, and music practice rooms, ” according to the Arcade website.

One of the commercial residents is Webster University’s Gateway Campus. It occupies 54,000 square feet of the building, according to this Oct. 3, 2017 news release from Webster University.

Ideas for change in Columbia?

OK, so maybe I am learning to like change. Maybe you can, too. What kind of change like this would you like to see in Columbia?

Ready to get in the car?

This event is a fundraiser for Missouri Preservation, a nonprofit historic preservation organization. The cost is $30 for Missouri Preservation members and $40 for nonmembers. What do you get for this? The event will include tours of the award-winning renovated 1919 building called a “Gothic Revival skyscraper.” It also will include music performed by Sarah Jane and the Blue Notes, and an open bar and appetizers from Urban Eats.

Can’t go, but you still want to see it?

This June 6, 2018 post on the National Association of Home Builders site will give you a sweet peek. The NAHB awarded the Arcade Apartments with not one, but two awards.

In 2017, the Arcade was named the Multifamily Pillars of the Industry Award winner in the “Best Affordable Apartment Community (Over 100 units)” category, said Crystal Jackson of the NAHB via an email. Jackson is the association’s director of multifamily and 55plus housing.  She added, “The Arcade was also a finalist in the “Best Adaptive Reuse” category in 2017.”

Here’s a peek at the project as it was underway via this Dec. 23, 2015 article in the St. Louis Business Journal.

So what kinds of renovations for buildings would you like to see in Columbia? 

 

 

 

Black History, Columbia College, Events, Historic Hours, University of Missouri

The arts — and history — aren’t dead

Musician J.W. “Blind” Boone. Singer Jane Froman. Both of these artistic luminaries and seven other historical figures from Columbia’s past will come alive through four-minute monologues held during 1 to 4 p.m. on May 29 at their graves in Columbia Cemetery on Broadway.

This event was highlighted in this “Living History event planned for Memorial Day,” article by Rudi Keller, published May 13, 2017 in the Columbia Tribune.

The event is sponsored by the Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery, which also has a Facebook page. The monologues were written by Chris Campbell, executive director of the Boone County Historical Society.

So who else will you get to see come to life – with a consciousness of who they were, their current deceased status and today’s events?

  • Ann Hawkins Gentry, Columbia postmistress from 1838-1865.
  • George Swallow, Missouri’s first state geologist and MU faculty member
  • John Lathrop, president of MU twice.
  • Sgt. Wallace Lilly, a slave who enlisted in the Union Army in 1864 for his freedom.
  • Luella St. Clair Moss, Columbia College president from 1893 to 1920.
  • James S. Rollins, a man considered the father of MU.
  • Walter Williams, founder of the MU School of Journalism and MU president from 1931 to 1935.
Historic Hours, Historical Homes, Uncategorized, University of Missouri

Twain did it, now you can do it. See the 1867 Italianate Chancellor’s Residence

But will cost you $15, which will go to a good cause. The Chancellor’s Residence at 501 N. Ninth St., is on the Women’s Symphony League Holiday Homes Tour set for 1-4 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 2, 3 and 4, 2016.

You can buy tickets at this website: Women’s Symphony League Holiday Homes Tour.

The Residence is one of five buildings on the tour, two at MU. The buildings are:

  • The home of Melissa and Josh Holyoak, 2709 Chapel Wood View
  • The home of Megan and Daniel Hoyt, 5307 E. Tayside Circle
  • Providence Point, University of Missouri President’s Residence, 1900 Providence Point
  • The Chancellor’s Residence, 501 S. Ninth St.,
  • Brouder Science Center, Columbia College, 705 Rangeline

Mark Twain dined in the residence in 1902 when he was on campus to receive an honorary degree, according to this MU document about the house. President Harry S Truman stayed there in 1950 and Eleanor Roosevelt stopped in for a rest there in 1959.

Now, the Foley family calls it home. But so does another resident, according to rumor and some accounts.

The house, documents recount, was finished in 1867, and is the oldest building on the campus of the oldest public university west of the Mississippi River.

In 1867, MU President Daniel Read moved in with his family and his wife Alice died there in 1874. This undated publication of the Columbia Missourian includes a video clip of Anne Deaton, wife of the former Chancellor Brady Deaton and a former resident of the Residence. She relates in the video an account of the grandfather clock that didn’t work chimed unexpectedly and the elevator would run without an occupant, incidents she attributes to Alice Read’s ghost.

The Residence, the article notes, is included in the recently book, “The Haunted Boonslick: Ghosts, Ghouls and Monsters of Missouri’s Heartland,” by Mary Barile.

Perhaps there are other hauntings. Until April 27, 2016, the Residence was occupied by R. Bowen Loftin, the chancellor who resigned the fall of 2015, ousted by student protests over what they called the university’s lack of response to racial incidents. His move out was covered and his sentiments highlighted in this June 27, 2016 Columbia Missourian article.

There have been other opportunities to take a peek at the resident of current Interim Chancellor Hank Foley and his wife Karin. They hosted an open house Sept. 24, 2016 with free admission.

But this weekend will give you a chance to see the Residence spruced up for the holidays and an opportunity to support music in Columbia. The proceeds from the holiday tour goes to the Women’s Symphony League, which supports the Missouri Symphony Society that brings a wide range of music to Columbia, Missouri.

It’s not as a nice a deal as Twain received with dining there and receiving an honorary degree, but it is an opportunity to see a historic home at its finest.

And that’s a good deal.

Columbia Historic Preservation Commission, Historic Hours

Mystery ghost tour of MU in photos

Did you have to miss last night’s ghost tour? Here’s a photo/text peek at the tour which was hosted by Columbia’s Historic Preservation Commission.

The tour discussed the ghosts and mysteries associated with the Residence on the Quad, the Columns as the remains of Academic Hall, where the Shack once stood, McAlester Hall, the Conley House and the Missouri Theatre.

This online tour is via the Columbia Missourian article headlined Historical Conservation Commission leads haunted Columbia tour.