You can make a difference

If you’ve ever felt discouraged about the demolition of Columbia’s historic structures, here’s a way you can get involved. The Columbia Historic Preservation Commission schedules work days to save parts of houses and structures before they’re demolished. Those items are then stored and later offered for sale.

Door and hardware from 121 S. Tenth St., March 1, 2016.

Solid wood doors and hardware saved prior to the demolition of the James Apartments, 121 S. Tenth St.

You can get involved saving these important parts of buildings before they’re lost.

Here’s a message from Pat Fowler, chair of the HPC:

Saturday, June 17, we are planning a salvage work day and a small scale salvage on a house soon to be demolished.  We need about 10 volunteers, in four-hour shifts, and a couple of pick-up trucks.  The city has set aside salvage from the Blind Boone home renovation and materials donated for our transport to our salvage barn in Rock Quarry Park.

One team will go to the little house and then join us to transport the Blind Boone salvage.

Part of our plan is to label the source of the Blind Boone Salvage and other items so that when we offer them for sale later this summer, we can convey to our purchasers as much information as we haveThe little house has some cool cabinets, some trim and we’d like to practice pulling some hardwood floor.

One of our new members on Historic Preservation, John Gagliardi, will be our team lead on the little house.

If you are interested, please send an email to fowlerpatj@gmail.com, or message us on the City of Columbia Historic Preservation Commission Facebook page, with your contact info.  We’ll send out specific start times, a suggested list of things to bring and be ready for your participation.

The Blue Note and Ragtag/Uprise/Hitt Records buildings honored

This just in — the buildings that house The Blue Note, Ragtag Cinema, Uprise Bakery and Hitt Records will be honored with a new award.

According to this Columbia Missourian March 28, 2017 article, Brent Gardner is creating Cornerstones to highlight downtown businesses and buildings.

The article states that the building at 10 Hitt St. was once the Coca-Cola Bottling Co. plant, built in 1935. The site where The Blue Note is now, 17 N. Ninth St., was where the Star theatre was before the Varsity Theatre was built by Tom C. Hill, who also owned the Hall Theatre, according to the article.

Gardner, the article reports, said an event to celebrate the two businesses could be held in July.

Gardner is a former member of the Columbia Historic Preservation Commission, which overseas the city’s Most Notable Properties list and celebration.

April 1 new Bull Pen salvage date

The salvage date for the Bull Pen Cafe has been pushed back to 8 a.m. Saturday, April 1, according to this update from Pat Fowler, a member of the Columbia Historic Preservation Commission

Fowler posted on Facebook, “More information following. Stay tuned. You are cordially invited to attend, tell stories, help us remove the seating and the barn wood inside the sales ring. Bring tools, wear goggles. You get the picture.”

As previously posted, Fowler is looking for help to salvage parts of the Bull Pen Cafe, a local eatery that was open for 60 years prior to its closing in 2007. Salvage efforts are planned for 9 a.m. Saturday, March 25. The Bull Pen is at 2310 Business Loop, Columbia, Missouri.

She and the commission are also looking for stories about the Bull Pen Cafe. For more information, contact Fowler at fowlerpatj@gmail.com, call or text (573) 256-6841.

As Fowler wrote on her Facebook page, and I’m posting her with her permission:

“You may have heard the Bull Pen Cafe will be demolished in the coming weeks. If you grew up in Columbia and attended a livestock auction, you’ll remember the amphitheater seating immediately behind the restaurant. We’d like to remove as many of those seats as we can muster volunteers for. There are also some other cool amenities inside that space we’d like to remove and put in the salvage barn for an upcoming city sponsored sale. Message me here, or on the HPC FB page if you can help. There are lots of great stories to ‘show and tell’ about the Bull Pen Cafe. We’d like to hear them.”

The upcoming demolition was covered in this March 10, 2017 Columbia Missourian article headlined, “Bull Pen Cafe building will face the wrecking ball.”

Here’s a link to a July 20, 2008 Columbia Missourian article about the Bull Pen. The headline is, “Cafe irreplaceable to regulars.

 

Why not nominate your home for Notable Properties designation?

Worried about restrictions? Think your home isn’t grand enough? Fearful of extra taxes? Shrinking from publicity? Fear not.

If these are reasons you are avoiding or someone you know is putting off nominating a property to the Columbia’s Notable Properties list, that’s balderdash.

Modest homes like a Cape Cod at 1252 Sunset Drive has been named to the list. Worried you’ll have to keep up appearances? Bah. The house on the list at Garth and Worley, a shotgun house, isn’t even at that spot anymore! Concerned you won’t be able to do as you like with your house? The Annie Fisher house at 2911 Old Highway 63 South was torn down in 2011, without nary a petition or protest to mark its passing.

2911 Old 63 S., Annie Fisher House, demolished 2011

2911 Old 63 S., Annie Fisher House, demolished 2011

Here’s a brochure about what it means to have a property listed.

So am I going to nominate my home? Yes, I just might, but it might not meet the criteria. My house is older than 50 years, at least part of it. An addition was added at some point, but this opportunity gives me a chance to do some digging, and as a journalist, that digging is what I love.

It might not meet the other criteria such as whether anything of local, regional or national note ever took place here, unless I can count starting this blog with its 43,488 followers. As for the unusual or notable architectural qualities, I think as a ranch style, one of the country’s most popular forms, that might make it worthy.

Think you might want to give it a try? Here’s the application form.

With less than two months for nominations to Columbia’s Notable Property list, this article in the Columbia Missourian frets that only one property has been submitted for consideration.

So what is holding you back?

 

Learn and snag some history

Looking for something unique? Want to learn how to fix up your home?

Both of those two possibilities will be on tap from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. tomorrow, Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 10 and 11 at the city’s storage barn in Rock Quarry Park at 2002 Grindstone Parkway.

Members of the Columbia Historic Preservation Commission and untold volunteers have managed to snag and store items from more than a dozen historic buildings that have been razed. Now, those items that range from bathtubs to window frames will be sold.

But it’s not just a historic shop-a-thon. According to this article in the Columbia Daily Tribune, there will be workshops at 11:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. on Saturday to help people learn how to reinstall the doors and windows.

The sale will be cash or check only, noted Pat Fowler, a member of the Historic Preservation Commission, in the article. The take from the sale will go to the city and set aside for future preservation efforts.

Can’t attend the sale or workshops? You can still keep up with preservation efforts by connecting with the Facebook page of the City of Columbia Historic Preservation Commission.

You can save history – or at least a piece of it

If you live in Columbia, Missouri, you’ve probably heard a 1903 former hotel is coming down. But you might not know that you can help save pieces of this historic building for salvage, even, perhaps for installation elsewhere downtown in the future. Here’s a look at what can be saved and how you can help.

Louvered doors in the former Winn Hotel, 1903, 121 S. Tenth St., Columbia, Missouri. Photo used with permission.

Louvered doors in the former Winn Hotel, 1903, 121 S. Tenth St., Columbia, Missouri. Photo used with permission.

In-wall tables in the former Winn Hotel, 1903, 121 S. Tenth St., Columbia, Missouri. Photo used with permission.

In-wall tables in the former Winn Hotel, 1903, 121 S. Tenth St., Columbia, Missouri. Photo used with permission.

Here’s a post from Pat Fowler, a member of Columbia Historic Preservation Commission, reprinted with permission:

“Thank you for agreeing to share this information with your students, circle of friends, family members and co-workers. At last look we had 29 of our slots filled, with 100 more to go. Some slots are 2 hours, some are 4 hours, all contribute measurably to the greater goal of saving what is unique and special about the James (formerly the Winn Hotel and the Tenth Street Elks Lodge). We welcome our volunteers signing up for more than one shift if their busy lives permit.

Send any questions via email to fowlerpatj@gmail.com or text 573-256-6841.

Our planning team: On site Rosie Gerding and I will share volunteer coordinator duties, one of us will be on premises for the duration to greet each of the volunteers, provide breakfast snacks, coffee, lunch food, beverages, get what ever is needed from what ever source, and make certain we have cleared your path, literally and figuratively, to get the work done as efficiently as possible. Dan Cullimore, Kelly Veach, Douglas Jones and Mark Wahrenbrock will lead teams in de-construction, door and hardware removal, fixture removal and a handful of us will assist Habitat’s ReStore with our appliance dollies in getting the 21 refrigerators, several of the stoves and a new, still in the box, water heater out the door and to their truck.

Though we can’t save the building, we can save many of the items that are uniquely the James. I’ve attached both our most recent flyer and a photo array of many though not all of the items we seek to remove safely for re-purposing. Please spread the word.

If you have a few hours to participate, please use our sign up tool; we look forward to greeting you inside the front door of the James.

Best,

Pat
573-256-6841 (text and voice)

P.S. I’m to visit with Simon and Renee on KFRU’s Morning Meeting on Friday, 10:00 ish. Tune in. A press release is in the works, watch the local coverage on Thursday wink emoticon

Seeing inside the James Apartments before the demolition

The 1903 James Apartments, once known as the Winn Hotel and the Elks Lodge, is set for demolition, but not all is lost. These articles summarize how Historic Preservation Commission member Pat Fowler organized a group of people to swarm, document and brainstorm how to save the best pieces of the building.

A date for removal will be set and an electronic sign up sheet will be posted soon.

Below is a gallery of photos and then a list of the recent articles about the upcoming demolition of the building at 121 S. Tenth St.

But if you’d like to get a peek inside now, before the crowbars get going, here are three views of the building, including that of an MU law student who plans to work with officials to get zoning put in place to stop the loss of other historic buildings and to support affordable student housing downtown.

I attended this documentation, list-making event, and here are pictures from that event, Tuesday, March 1, 2016.

March 2, 2016 — Law student starts petition to preserve historic downtown, The Maneater. Summary: Grace Shemwell, a second-year MU law student started a petition to save the James Condominium, the former Winn Hotel, at 121 S. Tenth St. While the petition with 2,636 signatures can’t save this building set for demolition, she plans to work with city officials to create zoning to protect historic buildings and incentivize affordable student housing.