Black History, Cemeteries, CoMo200, Events, Missouri Preservation, Tours, Women

Events: Sandbagging, bicentennial, History Comes Alive

  • Today Wednesday, May 22, 2019 – until?  The Rocheport Merchants Association has posted on Facebook that volunteers to help sandbag are being sought. Check out the RMA’s Facebook page “>here
  • 5:30 p.m. Thursday, May 23, 2019 — Get involved now, enjoy the Bicentennial in 2021! Right now, the Mayor’s Task Force on the Bicentennial Celebration is making plans for our city’s 200th birthday. Every person’s input is needed to make this a truly inclusive event. The Taskforce’s next public meeting will be held in the Walton Building at 300 S. Providence Road. What? Haven’t heard about this upcoming big bash? The task force was launched in February of 2018.  It announced three goals for its plans: diversity, creating a lasting tribute to the 200 years of Columbia’s history and having a fun celebration.
  • 1-4 p.m. Monday, May 27, 2019 — History Comes Alive. This free, family friendly event is in its third year. Held at the Columbia Cemetery, the event features repeated performances all afternoon of experienced actors including Ed Hanson portraying well-known Columbians. Here’s a video of Cindy Mustard of Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery on Paul Pepper and Friends. This year’s event will include portrayals of entrepreneur and former slave Henry Kirklin, architect Mary Louise Hale Lafon, suffragist Helen Guthrie, businessman Jefferson Garth, educator and legislator David H. Hickman and entrepreneur Frederick Niedermeyer. This event is sponsored by Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery, a nonprofit.
  • June 19-June 21, 2019 — Missouri Preservation’s annual conference will be held in St. Joseph, Missouri this year. Missouri Preservation, also known as the Missouri Alliance for Historic Preservation. Headquartered in St. Louis, it is a nonprofit dedicated to education, advocacy and assistance. Its conferences highlight preservation efforts and provide education and networking opportunities. Anyone can attend. The conference costs between $75 and $230 depending on how much of the conference you plan to attend. Register here.
Black History, Cemeteries, Events, Get involved, Missouri Preservation, Tours

Coming up: Listening sessions, a party, cemetery history and state conference

  • 6 p.m., Tuesday, May 14, 2019, & 5:30 p.m., Tuesday, May 21 — Boone County is holding listening sessions to get community input for its bicentennial celebration. Here’s a news release about the May 14 listening session to be held in the Centralia City Hall Community Room at 114 S. Rollins St., in Centralia. Here’s a link to the news release about the May 21 session to be held in the Activity and Recreation Center (ARC), meeting room C at 1701 W. Ash St. in Columbia
  • The release states:
    “Local artist/educator Stacy Self (Wildy World) will be creating a large mural in the shape of Boone County that depicts 200 years of Boone County history. Self, well-known for her work creating murals as community collaborations, will divide the entire space into pieces, each representing distinct geographic sections of the County. For each piece, she will seek community input about what is unique and important about that area. Based on that input, Self will design the artwork and then the community will be invited to return and paint its portion of the mural. After all pieces are complete, they will be joined to form the “map” of Boone County, which will be on display during 2020 in the Boone County History & Culture Center. At the close of the Bicentennial Year, the pieces will be given to the communities that created them, where they will be displayed for posterity.” For more information, contact Janet Thompson at jthompson@boonecountymo.org or 573-886-4309.
  • 5-8 p.m. Saturday, May 18 — 155th Birthday Party for John William “Blind” Boone in the historic Boone house at 10 N. Fourth St. The free event will include food and music and an opportunity to see the stunning restoration of this Victorian home.
  • 5:30 p.m. Thursday, May 23, 2019 — The Mayor’s Task Force on the Bicentennial Celebration will meet in the Walton Building at 300 S. Providence Road. The task force is planning the celebration of Columbia’s 200th anniversary. The meeting is open to the public. The task force was launched in February of 2018.  It announced three goals for its plans: diversity, creating a lasting tribute to the 200 years of Columbia’s history and having a fun celebration.
  • 1-4 p.m. Monday, May 27, 2019 — History Comes Alive. This free, family friendly event is in its third year. Held at the Columbia Cemetery, the event features actors portraying well-known Columbians. This year’s roster includes agricultural entrepreneur Henry Kirklin, architect Mary Louise Hale Lafon, suffragist Helen Guthrie, businessman Jefferson Garth, educator and legislator David H. Hickman and entrepreneur Frederick Niedermeyer. This event is sponsored by Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery, a nonprofit.
  • June 19-June 21, 2019 — Missouri Preservation annual conference in St. Joseph, Missouri. Each year, Missouri Preservation, a state nonprofit dedicated to education, advocacy and assistance, holds a conference. The conference highlights preservation efforts and provides education and networking opportunities. Anyone can attend. The conference costs between $75 and $230 depending on how much of the conference you plan to attend. Register here. The organization’s full name is the Missouri Alliance for Historic Preservation and it is headquartered in St. Louis.

 

Black History, Cemeteries, CoMo200, Events, Get involved, Historic Hours, Historic Preservation Commission, News Roundup, Sacred Spaces, Women

Events: Park meeting, preservation, DNA, birthday party and cemetery gets lively

Get out the slow cooker and shuffle your take-out menus, you’re going to be busy this month!

  • 7 p.m. Monday, May 6, 2019 — Columbia City Council is meeting and the expansion of Flat Branch Park is up for discussion. The meeting will be held in Council Chambers at 701 E. Broadway. How’s history connected here? The park expansion is part of plans to celebrate Columbia’s bicentennial in 2021, and park construction is set to start next year. At the heart of the matter is more parking for the commercial building at Providence and Broadway owned by Mark Stevenson. The building is the former Ice House, which has been at the heart of a building controversy before. The building has been saved, but now the question is how much parking where. Tonight’s meeting will cover the four different options highlighted in this article, “Parking spaces at center of debate in Flat Branch Park expansion project,” published in the Columbia Missourian on May 5, 2019.
  • 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 7, 2018DNA for Genealogists, a program featuring international genealogy consultant Kathleen Brandt will be held at the Columbia Public Library. Free and open to the public, the event announcement states Brandt will help people unscramble DNA which test might be right for you and help people look for their ancestry including Native American or Jewish ancestry.
  • 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 7, 2019Historic Preservation Commission meeting. in Conference Room 1C at City Hall. This group helps guide the city’s preservation efforts. It meets monthly and topics on this month’s agenda include demolition permits, a follow up on 917, 919 W. Broadway and 14 N. West Blvd., and plans for a window workshop. This meeting is open to the public.
  • 5-8 p.m. Saturday, May 18155th Birthday Party for John William “Blind” Boone in the historic Boone house at 10 N. Fourth St. The free event will include food and music and an opportunity to see the stunning restoration of this Victorian home.
  • 1-4 p.m. Monday, May 27, 2019History Comes Alive. This free, family friendly event is in its third year. Held at the Columbia Cemetery, the event features actors portraying well-known Columbians. This year’s roster includes agricultural entrepreneur Henry Kirklin, architect Mary Louise Hale Lafon, suffragist Helen Guthrie, businessman Jefferson Garth, educator and legislator David H. Hickman and entrepreneur Frederick Niedermeyer. This event is sponsored by Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery, a nonprofit.

 

Cemeteries, Columbia College, Events, Sacred Spaces, Stephens College, Tours, University of Missouri, Women

MU’s first female journalism graduate portrayed

The late Mary Paxton Keeley spoke from the beyond through an event sponsored by the Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery.

Keeley, MU’s first female journalism graduate, said through this interpretive event she was on the steps in 1909 when Walter Williams opened the doors to the what is reported to be the world’s first School of Journalism.

She described her work at the Kansas City Post, as well as her teaching journalism and creative writing at Christian College, now Columbia College, and how she once bicycled through the streets of Columbia before her death at 100.

Other famous Columbia residents portrayed and videos of the performances were posted on the Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery Facebook page.

Here are the names and links to the videos on YouTube:

Other portrayed were Victor Barth, Richard Henry Jesse and Robert Beverly Price

The scripts were written by Chris Campbell, executive director of the Boone County History and Culture Center. The event was sponsored by the Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery.

See the news coverage of the event for more information:

May 28, 2018 — Columbia Cemetery comes alive for Memorial Day, KOMU.com. Summary: Re-enactors at Columbia’s oldest cemetery portrayed historical figures buried there including James L. Stephens, Victor Barth, Richard Henry Jesse, Mary Paxton Keeley, John Lange Sr., Robert Beverly Price and Brig. Gen. Oden Guitar. The event was sponsored by the Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery.

May 28, 2018 — Columbia residents learn when History Comes Alive, Columbia Missourian. Summary: Hundreds attended the second annual History Comes Alive event at the Columbia Cemetery.