Black History, News Roundup

News: Flooding, Salute to Veterans canceled, racial disparity in traffic stops

Did you know you can get this news round-up in your mailbox? Just sign up on the right and an email will be sent to you when I put up a new post. Don’t worry about me using your email again for advertisements. I’m not that tech savvy.

Here’s the news:

 

 

Black History, Cemeteries, CoMo200, Events, Missouri Preservation, Tours, Women

Events: Sandbagging, bicentennial, History Comes Alive

  • Today Wednesday, May 22, 2019 – until?  The Rocheport Merchants Association has posted on Facebook that volunteers to help sandbag are being sought. Check out the RMA’s Facebook page “>here
  • 5:30 p.m. Thursday, May 23, 2019 — Get involved now, enjoy the Bicentennial in 2021! Right now, the Mayor’s Task Force on the Bicentennial Celebration is making plans for our city’s 200th birthday. Every person’s input is needed to make this a truly inclusive event. The Taskforce’s next public meeting will be held in the Walton Building at 300 S. Providence Road. What? Haven’t heard about this upcoming big bash? The task force was launched in February of 2018.  It announced three goals for its plans: diversity, creating a lasting tribute to the 200 years of Columbia’s history and having a fun celebration.
  • 1-4 p.m. Monday, May 27, 2019 — History Comes Alive. This free, family friendly event is in its third year. Held at the Columbia Cemetery, the event features repeated performances all afternoon of experienced actors including Ed Hanson portraying well-known Columbians. Here’s a video of Cindy Mustard of Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery on Paul Pepper and Friends. This year’s event will include portrayals of entrepreneur and former slave Henry Kirklin, architect Mary Louise Hale Lafon, suffragist Helen Guthrie, businessman Jefferson Garth, educator and legislator David H. Hickman and entrepreneur Frederick Niedermeyer. This event is sponsored by Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery, a nonprofit.
  • June 19-June 21, 2019 — Missouri Preservation’s annual conference will be held in St. Joseph, Missouri this year. Missouri Preservation, also known as the Missouri Alliance for Historic Preservation. Headquartered in St. Louis, it is a nonprofit dedicated to education, advocacy and assistance. Its conferences highlight preservation efforts and provide education and networking opportunities. Anyone can attend. The conference costs between $75 and $230 depending on how much of the conference you plan to attend. Register here.
Black History, Cemeteries, Events, Get involved, Missouri Preservation, Tours

Coming up: Listening sessions, a party, cemetery history and state conference

  • 6 p.m., Tuesday, May 14, 2019, & 5:30 p.m., Tuesday, May 21 — Boone County is holding listening sessions to get community input for its bicentennial celebration. Here’s a news release about the May 14 listening session to be held in the Centralia City Hall Community Room at 114 S. Rollins St., in Centralia. Here’s a link to the news release about the May 21 session to be held in the Activity and Recreation Center (ARC), meeting room C at 1701 W. Ash St. in Columbia
  • The release states:
    “Local artist/educator Stacy Self (Wildy World) will be creating a large mural in the shape of Boone County that depicts 200 years of Boone County history. Self, well-known for her work creating murals as community collaborations, will divide the entire space into pieces, each representing distinct geographic sections of the County. For each piece, she will seek community input about what is unique and important about that area. Based on that input, Self will design the artwork and then the community will be invited to return and paint its portion of the mural. After all pieces are complete, they will be joined to form the “map” of Boone County, which will be on display during 2020 in the Boone County History & Culture Center. At the close of the Bicentennial Year, the pieces will be given to the communities that created them, where they will be displayed for posterity.” For more information, contact Janet Thompson at jthompson@boonecountymo.org or 573-886-4309.
  • 5-8 p.m. Saturday, May 18 — 155th Birthday Party for John William “Blind” Boone in the historic Boone house at 10 N. Fourth St. The free event will include food and music and an opportunity to see the stunning restoration of this Victorian home.
  • 5:30 p.m. Thursday, May 23, 2019 — The Mayor’s Task Force on the Bicentennial Celebration will meet in the Walton Building at 300 S. Providence Road. The task force is planning the celebration of Columbia’s 200th anniversary. The meeting is open to the public. The task force was launched in February of 2018.  It announced three goals for its plans: diversity, creating a lasting tribute to the 200 years of Columbia’s history and having a fun celebration.
  • 1-4 p.m. Monday, May 27, 2019 — History Comes Alive. This free, family friendly event is in its third year. Held at the Columbia Cemetery, the event features actors portraying well-known Columbians. This year’s roster includes agricultural entrepreneur Henry Kirklin, architect Mary Louise Hale Lafon, suffragist Helen Guthrie, businessman Jefferson Garth, educator and legislator David H. Hickman and entrepreneur Frederick Niedermeyer. This event is sponsored by Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery, a nonprofit.
  • June 19-June 21, 2019 — Missouri Preservation annual conference in St. Joseph, Missouri. Each year, Missouri Preservation, a state nonprofit dedicated to education, advocacy and assistance, holds a conference. The conference highlights preservation efforts and provides education and networking opportunities. Anyone can attend. The conference costs between $75 and $230 depending on how much of the conference you plan to attend. Register here. The organization’s full name is the Missouri Alliance for Historic Preservation and it is headquartered in St. Louis.

 

Black History, Cemeteries, CoMo200, Events, Get involved, Historic Hours, Historic Preservation Commission, News Roundup, Sacred Spaces, Women

Events: Park meeting, preservation, DNA, birthday party and cemetery gets lively

Get out the slow cooker and shuffle your take-out menus, you’re going to be busy this month!

  • 7 p.m. Monday, May 6, 2019 — Columbia City Council is meeting and the expansion of Flat Branch Park is up for discussion. The meeting will be held in Council Chambers at 701 E. Broadway. How’s history connected here? The park expansion is part of plans to celebrate Columbia’s bicentennial in 2021, and park construction is set to start next year. At the heart of the matter is more parking for the commercial building at Providence and Broadway owned by Mark Stevenson. The building is the former Ice House, which has been at the heart of a building controversy before. The building has been saved, but now the question is how much parking where. Tonight’s meeting will cover the four different options highlighted in this article, “Parking spaces at center of debate in Flat Branch Park expansion project,” published in the Columbia Missourian on May 5, 2019.
  • 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 7, 2018DNA for Genealogists, a program featuring international genealogy consultant Kathleen Brandt will be held at the Columbia Public Library. Free and open to the public, the event announcement states Brandt will help people unscramble DNA which test might be right for you and help people look for their ancestry including Native American or Jewish ancestry.
  • 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 7, 2019Historic Preservation Commission meeting. in Conference Room 1C at City Hall. This group helps guide the city’s preservation efforts. It meets monthly and topics on this month’s agenda include demolition permits, a follow up on 917, 919 W. Broadway and 14 N. West Blvd., and plans for a window workshop. This meeting is open to the public.
  • 5-8 p.m. Saturday, May 18155th Birthday Party for John William “Blind” Boone in the historic Boone house at 10 N. Fourth St. The free event will include food and music and an opportunity to see the stunning restoration of this Victorian home.
  • 1-4 p.m. Monday, May 27, 2019History Comes Alive. This free, family friendly event is in its third year. Held at the Columbia Cemetery, the event features actors portraying well-known Columbians. This year’s roster includes agricultural entrepreneur Henry Kirklin, architect Mary Louise Hale Lafon, suffragist Helen Guthrie, businessman Jefferson Garth, educator and legislator David H. Hickman and entrepreneur Frederick Niedermeyer. This event is sponsored by Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery, a nonprofit.

 

Black History, News Roundup

News: Scott lynching re-examined, West Broadway plan push back

April 26, 2019 — An author retraces James T. Scott’s life, ending the silence about her family’s link to his death. Part 1. Columbia Missourian. Summary: Pat Roberts, now deceased, wrote a book about James T. Scott after she learned her aunt was the girl who accused him of attempting to rape her. This accusation by Regina Almstedt, 14, at the time, led to Scott’s murder by lynching. Roberts’ family had never discussed Scott’s murder in 1923. Roberts learned of the family connection from a 2003 series in the Columbia Missourian related to the lynching. The name of the book is “A lynching in Little Dixie: The Life and Death of James T. Scott.”

April 27, 2019 — Lifting the cloud, a detailed history of the Scott lynching. Part 2. Columbia Missourian. Summary: This part outlines why the family never discussed the lynching death of James T. Scott, why the author wrote the book, outlines what Columbia groups have done to mark and/or commemorate Scott’s death.

April 27, 2019 — In the 1990s, a play chronicled James T. Scott’s lynching for local, national audiences. Columbia Missourian. Summary: Eric Wilson and Clyde Ruffin wrote a play, “Strands,” in 1991. The play premiered in Columbia, and went on to win the 1992 Lorraine Hansberry Playwriting Award, and was performed as part of the American College Theatre Festival in the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C.

April 27, 2019 — Rezoning plan revives West Broadway issues. Columbia Daily Tribune. Summary: Local doctor Mohammad Jarbou purchased homes at 917 W. Broadway, 919 W. Broadway and 14 N. West Blvd., with plans to demolish them and redevelop the area. Columbia residents are pushing back.

Note: A Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/groups/SaveHistoricBroadway/, has been created to disseminate information about thwarting the effort to demolish the houses.

April 30, 2019 — Guest Commentary: Columbia only goes through the motions of racial reconciliation. Columbia Missourian. Summary: Author Traci Wilson-Kleekamp states the article and book were insufficient and that the article, book and 2003 series did not property address the harm to Gertrude Carter Scott, Scott’s widow. Wilson-Kleekamp’s commentary calls on the city of Columbia, the University of Missouri and the School of Medicine, where James T. Scott was employed, to do more to highlight Scott’s life. The piece also notes the Columbia Public School should have a curriculum that honors black contributions to the community.

Black History, Books

Book on Columbia lynching victims

I’ve always thought there were many missing stories in the reports about the 1923 murder of James T. Scott when he was lynched based on an accusation of attempting to rape a 14-year-old girl.

A new book apparently looks at two of the stories: the one about the life of James T. Scott and the one about the girl who accused him. This April 26, 2019 Columbia Missourian article by Tynan Stewart highlights a book written about Scott. The article is the first of a two-part report on the book, “A Lynching in Little Dixie.” 

I can’t wait to read the second article and the book in hopes that it explains the question of how a murder like this can take place in broad daylight in a town of allegedly educated people.

Other questions I’ve always included what happened to his family and friends after this? What happened to the girl whose accusation led to the murder of a man who was very likely not guilty?

And if he wasn’t guilty, then the person who committed the crime was never brought to justice. What happened from the result of that? Were there other victims?

Other questions give me pause. What happened to the people who were part of the murder of Scott? How did they go on? Were they ridden with guilt? Were their lives crippled, their spirits crushed, even if the legal system left them unscathed, as we know it did.

But the question I’m really afraid to ask is has Columbia made sure that nothing like this can ever happen again?

Black History, Schools, University of Missouri

Two surprise news items: Legion of Black Collegians history and Sanborn Field

At MU, in 1950, the first black student was enrolled at the University of Missouri.  In 1968, there were fewer than 500 black students there and no black professors at all. That year, the Legion of Black Collegians was launched to support black students

Two years prior, in 1948, a fungus was discovered that lead to the development of an antibiotic. It was found in the soil at Sanborn Field, one of only about 2,500 National Historic Landmarks in the U.S.

The permission to republish these two articles from MIZZOU magazine’s Winter 2019 issue provides information on the racial struggles at the MU and the importance of Sanborn field. This magazine is typically only available to those who receive this MU alumni magazine, so this is a special opportunity to learn about MU’s history.

  • Winter 2019 — Marking 50 Years. PDF copy. Source: MIZZOU magazine. Summary: The Legion of Black Collegians is celebrating 50 years. The article notes mile markers such as the launch of the LBC, the first formal student organization focused on the black student population, 1969 the creation of the Black Studies Program, the 1974 successful advocation for the removal of Confederate Rock from campus, the 1990 sit-in to get Dr. Martin Luther King’s birthday recognized as a holiday, 2013 change of the Black Studies Program into the Black Studies Department, LBC students and others form Concerned Student 1950 to demand policy changes to shift the culture at MU, 2018 the UM System pledges $8.5 million for the Missouri Compact for Inclusive Excellence, and in 2018, MU dedicates building or spaces to Lucile Bluford, George C. Brooks and Gus T. Ridgel. Note: The copy of this article is republished here with permission from MIZZOU magazine.
  • Winter 2019 — Old Field, New Ideas. Source: MIZZOU Magazine. Summary: Sanborn Field, established in 1888, was named a National Historic Landmark in 1964. It was named after J.W. Sanborn, director of the Missouri Agricultural Experimental Station. In 1948, William A. Albrecht found streptomyces aureofaciens there which became the basis for Aureomycin, an antibiotic widely prescribed from the 1940s to the 1980s. The Smithsonian Institute has a sample of the Sanborn soil. The copy of this article is republished here with permission from MIZZOU magazine.