Areas, Historical Homes, Resources - Reports

A 1994 view of East Campus

On Monday, Columbia City Council OK’d the creation of a new East Campus neighborhood association. But on this website, I like to look into the past.

Here’s a report from February 1994 that will let you take a peek at the past in the East Campus area. The document includes a 1931 map of the area and an explanation of how the area grew.

Below is a link to coverage of the July 16, 2018 city council meeting.

July 17, 2018 — Council approves new East Campus neighborhood association. Source: Columbia Missourian. Summary: City Council voted to recognized a new neighborhood association for the East Campus area. The new association is the East Campus Traditional Neighborhood Association, made up mainly of landlords. The older organization, the East Campus Neighborhood Association is an older organization made up mainly of homeowners, according to the article.

University of Missouri

Tree loss at MU’s historic Francis Quadrangle

Five pin oaks will be removed from MU’s main quadrangle. Here are three different reports on the loss of the trees. The trees are 60 years old, but should have lived until 80 to 100 years, but the soil and watering to support the grass led to the early death of the trees, according to the reports.

Don’t like MU spending money on trees instead of your favorite cause? The news release states the costs for the replacement of the trees will come from a special Mizzou Botanic Garden fundraising campaign. The trees will be replaced with native oak species.

Areas, Commercial Buildings, Tours

1978 look at Broadway, Seventh and Ninth streets

Miller Shoe Store, 800 East Broadway, courtesy the City of Columbia
800 E. Broadway in 2002. What was there before? A 1978 report will tell you. Photo courtesy the City of Columbia

Want to take a walk through the past? This 1978 historic survey report on Columbia’s buildings on Broadway, Seventh and Ninth streets and it reads like a walk through time, describing the buildings as they were in 1978 — and what they once looked like and what was there before then.

For example, the report on 720 E. Broadway, now Central Bank of Boone County, states the building once sported bronze doors.

The report goes on to state in 1889, the lot was home to a carriage factory and harness shop. Between 1889 and 1895, a three-story brick building on that spot housed “various smithys, groceries and lodge halls,” the report states. “In 1916 these two buildings were demolished for the present Boone County Bank.”

The report contains a page or two on each building on Broadway, some on Seventh and Ninth streets, pictures and citations to newspaper and other publications.

So download the report, print it out and if the weather ever cools down, take a walk through the past and try to see what was once there and what’s left behind.

Events, Get involved, Historic Hours, Missouri Preservation

Hate change? St. Louis event might change your mind

I’m going to admit it: I hate change. But an event set in St. Louis on Friday, July 20, 2018 has me rethinking my attitude.

From 5-8 p.m., a Missouri Preservation fundraiser will be held in the Arcade Building at 800 Olive St., in St. Louis, and the event will include rooftop views of the Arch, music, an open bar and appetizers.

Vacant for nearly 30 years, the former office/retail block is now an apartment complex with commercial space — with special appeal to artists.  The National Historic Landmark building includes more than 11,000 square feet of shared work and studio spaces including a “music and multi-media studio, and music practice rooms, ” according to the Arcade website.

One of the commercial residents is Webster University’s Gateway Campus. It occupies 54,000 square feet of the building, according to this Oct. 3, 2017 news release from Webster University.

Ideas for change in Columbia?

OK, so maybe I am learning to like change. Maybe you can, too. What kind of change like this would you like to see in Columbia?

Ready to get in the car?

This event is a fundraiser for Missouri Preservation, a nonprofit historic preservation organization. The cost is $30 for Missouri Preservation members and $40 for nonmembers. What do you get for this? The event will include tours of the award-winning renovated 1919 building called a “Gothic Revival skyscraper.” It also will include music performed by Sarah Jane and the Blue Notes, and an open bar and appetizers from Urban Eats.

Can’t go, but you still want to see it?

This June 6, 2018 post on the National Association of Home Builders site will give you a sweet peek. The NAHB awarded the Arcade Apartments with not one, but two awards.

In 2017, the Arcade was named the Multifamily Pillars of the Industry Award winner in the “Best Affordable Apartment Community (Over 100 units)” category, said Crystal Jackson of the NAHB via an email. Jackson is the association’s director of multifamily and 55plus housing.  She added, “The Arcade was also a finalist in the “Best Adaptive Reuse” category in 2017.”

Here’s a peek at the project as it was underway via this Dec. 23, 2015 article in the St. Louis Business Journal.

So what kinds of renovations for buildings would you like to see in Columbia? 

 

 

 

Cemeteries, Columbia College, Events, Sacred Spaces, Stephens College, Tours, University of Missouri, Women

MU’s first female journalism graduate portrayed

The late Mary Paxton Keeley spoke from the beyond through an event sponsored by the Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery.

Keeley, MU’s first female journalism graduate, said through this interpretive event she was on the steps in 1909 when Walter Williams opened the doors to the what is reported to be the world’s first School of Journalism.

She described her work at the Kansas City Post, as well as her teaching journalism and creative writing at Christian College, now Columbia College, and how she once bicycled through the streets of Columbia before her death at 100.

Other famous Columbia residents portrayed and videos of the performances were posted on the Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery Facebook page.

Here are the names and links to the videos on YouTube:

Other portrayed were Victor Barth, Richard Henry Jesse and Robert Beverly Price

The scripts were written by Chris Campbell, executive director of the Boone County History and Culture Center. The event was sponsored by the Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery.

See the news coverage of the event for more information:

May 28, 2018 — Columbia Cemetery comes alive for Memorial Day, KOMU.com. Summary: Re-enactors at Columbia’s oldest cemetery portrayed historical figures buried there including James L. Stephens, Victor Barth, Richard Henry Jesse, Mary Paxton Keeley, John Lange Sr., Robert Beverly Price and Brig. Gen. Oden Guitar. The event was sponsored by the Friends of the Historic Columbia Cemetery.

May 28, 2018 — Columbia residents learn when History Comes Alive, Columbia Missourian. Summary: Hundreds attended the second annual History Comes Alive event at the Columbia Cemetery.